Relationship between workplace social capital and suicidal ideation in the past year among employees in Japan

A cross-sectional study

Daisuke Hori, Soshi Takao, Ichiro Kawachi, Yuh Ohtaki, Christina Sylvia Andrea, Tsukasa Takahashi, Nagisa Shiraki, Tomohiko Ikeda, Yu Ikeda, Shotaro Doki, Yuichi Oi, Shinichiro Sasahara, Ichiyo Matsuzaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: A growing body of evidence has demonstrated the associations between social capital and health. In residential or geographical areas, social capital has attracted attention for its protective effects against suicide. However, to this date, the relationship between social capital and suicidal ideation is not fully elaborated in the occupational setting. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the association between workplace social capital and suicidal ideation in the past year among employees in Japan. Methods: A cross-sectional, web-based survey was conducted in February/March 2017 via an anonymous self-administered questionnaire distributed to workers in Tsukuba Science City, Japan. Binomial logistic regressions were used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for suicidal ideation in the past year, controlling for age group, marital status, educational attainment, and annual household income. The results were shown stratified by sex and occupation. Results: In total, 7255 of 19,481 workers responded, out of which we could analyze 6325 responses (4030 men, 2295 women). The prevalence of suicidal ideation in the past year was 5.9% for men and 7.8% for women. Low workplace social capital was statistically significantly associated with suicidal ideation both for men (OR = 2.57, 95% CI = 1.72-3.83) and for women (OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.15-2.66), compared with high workplace social capital after controlling for socioeconomic factors. Conclusion: Higher workplace social capital was associated with a reduced risk of suicidal ideation in the past year. Promoting workplace social capital could contribute to preventing suicide among employees in Japan.

Original languageEnglish
Article number919
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 9 2019

Fingerprint

Suicidal Ideation
Workplace
Japan
Cross-Sectional Studies
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Suicide
Social Capital
Marital Status
Occupations
Age Groups
Logistic Models
Health

Keywords

  • Japan
  • Researcher
  • Suicidal ideation
  • Tsukuba Science City
  • Workplace social capital

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Relationship between workplace social capital and suicidal ideation in the past year among employees in Japan : A cross-sectional study. / Hori, Daisuke; Takao, Soshi; Kawachi, Ichiro; Ohtaki, Yuh; Andrea, Christina Sylvia; Takahashi, Tsukasa; Shiraki, Nagisa; Ikeda, Tomohiko; Ikeda, Yu; Doki, Shotaro; Oi, Yuichi; Sasahara, Shinichiro; Matsuzaki, Ichiyo.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 19, No. 1, 919, 09.07.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hori, D, Takao, S, Kawachi, I, Ohtaki, Y, Andrea, CS, Takahashi, T, Shiraki, N, Ikeda, T, Ikeda, Y, Doki, S, Oi, Y, Sasahara, S & Matsuzaki, I 2019, 'Relationship between workplace social capital and suicidal ideation in the past year among employees in Japan: A cross-sectional study', BMC Public Health, vol. 19, no. 1, 919. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-019-7244-9
Hori, Daisuke ; Takao, Soshi ; Kawachi, Ichiro ; Ohtaki, Yuh ; Andrea, Christina Sylvia ; Takahashi, Tsukasa ; Shiraki, Nagisa ; Ikeda, Tomohiko ; Ikeda, Yu ; Doki, Shotaro ; Oi, Yuichi ; Sasahara, Shinichiro ; Matsuzaki, Ichiyo. / Relationship between workplace social capital and suicidal ideation in the past year among employees in Japan : A cross-sectional study. In: BMC Public Health. 2019 ; Vol. 19, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background: A growing body of evidence has demonstrated the associations between social capital and health. In residential or geographical areas, social capital has attracted attention for its protective effects against suicide. However, to this date, the relationship between social capital and suicidal ideation is not fully elaborated in the occupational setting. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the association between workplace social capital and suicidal ideation in the past year among employees in Japan. Methods: A cross-sectional, web-based survey was conducted in February/March 2017 via an anonymous self-administered questionnaire distributed to workers in Tsukuba Science City, Japan. Binomial logistic regressions were used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs) for suicidal ideation in the past year, controlling for age group, marital status, educational attainment, and annual household income. The results were shown stratified by sex and occupation. Results: In total, 7255 of 19,481 workers responded, out of which we could analyze 6325 responses (4030 men, 2295 women). The prevalence of suicidal ideation in the past year was 5.9{\%} for men and 7.8{\%} for women. Low workplace social capital was statistically significantly associated with suicidal ideation both for men (OR = 2.57, 95{\%} CI = 1.72-3.83) and for women (OR = 1.75, 95{\%} CI = 1.15-2.66), compared with high workplace social capital after controlling for socioeconomic factors. Conclusion: Higher workplace social capital was associated with a reduced risk of suicidal ideation in the past year. Promoting workplace social capital could contribute to preventing suicide among employees in Japan.",
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AU - Ohtaki, Yuh

AU - Andrea, Christina Sylvia

AU - Takahashi, Tsukasa

AU - Shiraki, Nagisa

AU - Ikeda, Tomohiko

AU - Ikeda, Yu

AU - Doki, Shotaro

AU - Oi, Yuichi

AU - Sasahara, Shinichiro

AU - Matsuzaki, Ichiyo

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N2 - Background: A growing body of evidence has demonstrated the associations between social capital and health. In residential or geographical areas, social capital has attracted attention for its protective effects against suicide. However, to this date, the relationship between social capital and suicidal ideation is not fully elaborated in the occupational setting. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the association between workplace social capital and suicidal ideation in the past year among employees in Japan. Methods: A cross-sectional, web-based survey was conducted in February/March 2017 via an anonymous self-administered questionnaire distributed to workers in Tsukuba Science City, Japan. Binomial logistic regressions were used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for suicidal ideation in the past year, controlling for age group, marital status, educational attainment, and annual household income. The results were shown stratified by sex and occupation. Results: In total, 7255 of 19,481 workers responded, out of which we could analyze 6325 responses (4030 men, 2295 women). The prevalence of suicidal ideation in the past year was 5.9% for men and 7.8% for women. Low workplace social capital was statistically significantly associated with suicidal ideation both for men (OR = 2.57, 95% CI = 1.72-3.83) and for women (OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.15-2.66), compared with high workplace social capital after controlling for socioeconomic factors. Conclusion: Higher workplace social capital was associated with a reduced risk of suicidal ideation in the past year. Promoting workplace social capital could contribute to preventing suicide among employees in Japan.

AB - Background: A growing body of evidence has demonstrated the associations between social capital and health. In residential or geographical areas, social capital has attracted attention for its protective effects against suicide. However, to this date, the relationship between social capital and suicidal ideation is not fully elaborated in the occupational setting. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the association between workplace social capital and suicidal ideation in the past year among employees in Japan. Methods: A cross-sectional, web-based survey was conducted in February/March 2017 via an anonymous self-administered questionnaire distributed to workers in Tsukuba Science City, Japan. Binomial logistic regressions were used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for suicidal ideation in the past year, controlling for age group, marital status, educational attainment, and annual household income. The results were shown stratified by sex and occupation. Results: In total, 7255 of 19,481 workers responded, out of which we could analyze 6325 responses (4030 men, 2295 women). The prevalence of suicidal ideation in the past year was 5.9% for men and 7.8% for women. Low workplace social capital was statistically significantly associated with suicidal ideation both for men (OR = 2.57, 95% CI = 1.72-3.83) and for women (OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.15-2.66), compared with high workplace social capital after controlling for socioeconomic factors. Conclusion: Higher workplace social capital was associated with a reduced risk of suicidal ideation in the past year. Promoting workplace social capital could contribute to preventing suicide among employees in Japan.

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