Relationship between severity of periodontitis and masseter muscle activity during waking and sleeping hours

Seiya Kato, Daisuke Ekuni, Shigehisa Kawakami, Acing Habibie Mude, Manabu Morita, Shougo Minagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study was conducted to investigate whether the masseter muscle activity shows any specific pattern in relation to the severity of periodontitis. Design: Sixteen subjects with no or mild periodontitis (NMP group) and 15 subjects with moderate or severe periodontitis (MSP group) were enrolled. Plasma IgG antibody titer was examined using Porphyromonas gingivalis as a bacterial antigen. Surface electromyography (EMG) of the masseter muscles was continuously recorded using an ambulatory surface EMG recording device while patients were awake and asleep. Masseter muscle activity was analyzed using intensities of 5%–10% maximal voluntary clenching (MVC), 10%–20% MVC, and >20% MVC. Furthermore, EMG levels of 20% MVC were adopted as the threshold for analysis of phasic, tonic, and mixed EMG activities. The cumulative duration of masseter muscle activity and bruxism episodes was calculated as duration per hour. Results: There was no significant difference in plasma IgG antibody titers against P. gingivalis between the NMP and MSP groups (p = 0.423). During waking hours, the duration of masseter muscle activity with an intensity of >20% MVC was significantly longer in the MSP group than in the NMP group (p = 0.037). During sleeping hours, the duration of masseter muscle activity at all MVC intensities was significantly longer in the MSP group than in the NMP group (all p < 0.05). Additionally, the duration of phasic and mixed episodes was significantly longer in the MSP group than those in the NMP group while both awake and asleep (all p < 0.05). Conclusions: The results of this study suggested that masseter muscle activity might be related to the severity of periodontitis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13-18
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Oral Biology
Volume90
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2018

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Masseter Muscle
Periodontitis
Electromyography
Porphyromonas gingivalis
Immunoglobulin G
Bruxism
Bacterial Antigens
Antibodies
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Bruxism
  • Masseter muscle activity
  • Periodontitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Dentistry(all)
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

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title = "Relationship between severity of periodontitis and masseter muscle activity during waking and sleeping hours",
abstract = "Objective: This study was conducted to investigate whether the masseter muscle activity shows any specific pattern in relation to the severity of periodontitis. Design: Sixteen subjects with no or mild periodontitis (NMP group) and 15 subjects with moderate or severe periodontitis (MSP group) were enrolled. Plasma IgG antibody titer was examined using Porphyromonas gingivalis as a bacterial antigen. Surface electromyography (EMG) of the masseter muscles was continuously recorded using an ambulatory surface EMG recording device while patients were awake and asleep. Masseter muscle activity was analyzed using intensities of 5{\%}–10{\%} maximal voluntary clenching (MVC), 10{\%}–20{\%} MVC, and >20{\%} MVC. Furthermore, EMG levels of 20{\%} MVC were adopted as the threshold for analysis of phasic, tonic, and mixed EMG activities. The cumulative duration of masseter muscle activity and bruxism episodes was calculated as duration per hour. Results: There was no significant difference in plasma IgG antibody titers against P. gingivalis between the NMP and MSP groups (p = 0.423). During waking hours, the duration of masseter muscle activity with an intensity of >20{\%} MVC was significantly longer in the MSP group than in the NMP group (p = 0.037). During sleeping hours, the duration of masseter muscle activity at all MVC intensities was significantly longer in the MSP group than in the NMP group (all p < 0.05). Additionally, the duration of phasic and mixed episodes was significantly longer in the MSP group than those in the NMP group while both awake and asleep (all p < 0.05). Conclusions: The results of this study suggested that masseter muscle activity might be related to the severity of periodontitis.",
keywords = "Bruxism, Masseter muscle activity, Periodontitis",
author = "Seiya Kato and Daisuke Ekuni and Shigehisa Kawakami and Mude, {Acing Habibie} and Manabu Morita and Shougo Minagi",
year = "2018",
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T1 - Relationship between severity of periodontitis and masseter muscle activity during waking and sleeping hours

AU - Kato, Seiya

AU - Ekuni, Daisuke

AU - Kawakami, Shigehisa

AU - Mude, Acing Habibie

AU - Morita, Manabu

AU - Minagi, Shougo

PY - 2018/6/1

Y1 - 2018/6/1

N2 - Objective: This study was conducted to investigate whether the masseter muscle activity shows any specific pattern in relation to the severity of periodontitis. Design: Sixteen subjects with no or mild periodontitis (NMP group) and 15 subjects with moderate or severe periodontitis (MSP group) were enrolled. Plasma IgG antibody titer was examined using Porphyromonas gingivalis as a bacterial antigen. Surface electromyography (EMG) of the masseter muscles was continuously recorded using an ambulatory surface EMG recording device while patients were awake and asleep. Masseter muscle activity was analyzed using intensities of 5%–10% maximal voluntary clenching (MVC), 10%–20% MVC, and >20% MVC. Furthermore, EMG levels of 20% MVC were adopted as the threshold for analysis of phasic, tonic, and mixed EMG activities. The cumulative duration of masseter muscle activity and bruxism episodes was calculated as duration per hour. Results: There was no significant difference in plasma IgG antibody titers against P. gingivalis between the NMP and MSP groups (p = 0.423). During waking hours, the duration of masseter muscle activity with an intensity of >20% MVC was significantly longer in the MSP group than in the NMP group (p = 0.037). During sleeping hours, the duration of masseter muscle activity at all MVC intensities was significantly longer in the MSP group than in the NMP group (all p < 0.05). Additionally, the duration of phasic and mixed episodes was significantly longer in the MSP group than those in the NMP group while both awake and asleep (all p < 0.05). Conclusions: The results of this study suggested that masseter muscle activity might be related to the severity of periodontitis.

AB - Objective: This study was conducted to investigate whether the masseter muscle activity shows any specific pattern in relation to the severity of periodontitis. Design: Sixteen subjects with no or mild periodontitis (NMP group) and 15 subjects with moderate or severe periodontitis (MSP group) were enrolled. Plasma IgG antibody titer was examined using Porphyromonas gingivalis as a bacterial antigen. Surface electromyography (EMG) of the masseter muscles was continuously recorded using an ambulatory surface EMG recording device while patients were awake and asleep. Masseter muscle activity was analyzed using intensities of 5%–10% maximal voluntary clenching (MVC), 10%–20% MVC, and >20% MVC. Furthermore, EMG levels of 20% MVC were adopted as the threshold for analysis of phasic, tonic, and mixed EMG activities. The cumulative duration of masseter muscle activity and bruxism episodes was calculated as duration per hour. Results: There was no significant difference in plasma IgG antibody titers against P. gingivalis between the NMP and MSP groups (p = 0.423). During waking hours, the duration of masseter muscle activity with an intensity of >20% MVC was significantly longer in the MSP group than in the NMP group (p = 0.037). During sleeping hours, the duration of masseter muscle activity at all MVC intensities was significantly longer in the MSP group than in the NMP group (all p < 0.05). Additionally, the duration of phasic and mixed episodes was significantly longer in the MSP group than those in the NMP group while both awake and asleep (all p < 0.05). Conclusions: The results of this study suggested that masseter muscle activity might be related to the severity of periodontitis.

KW - Bruxism

KW - Masseter muscle activity

KW - Periodontitis

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U2 - 10.1016/j.archoralbio.2018.02.021

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VL - 90

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JF - Archives of Oral Biology

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