Regulation of cellular immunity prevents Helicobacter pylori-induced atherosclerosis

K. Ayada, Kenji Yokota, K. Hirai, K. Fujimoto, Kazuko Kobayashi, Hiroko Ogawa, K. Hatanaka, Satoshi Hirohata, Tadashi Yoshino, Y. Shoenfeld, Eiji Matsuura, K. Oguma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a predominant pathogen that causes not only gastroduodenal diseases but also extra-alimentary tract diseases. In this study, we demonstrated that H. pylori infection promoted atherogenesis in heterozygous apoe+/- ldlr+/- mice. The male mice were fed with high fat diet from the age of 6 weeks. At the age of 16 weeks, development of atherosclerotic lesions was observed in the H. pylori-infected mice, and it seemed to be associated with an elevation of Th1-immune response against H. pylori origin-heat shock protein 60 (Hp-HSP60) and an increment of transendothelial migration of T cells. Subcutaneous immunisation with Hp-HSP60 or H. pylori eradication with antibiotics significantly reduced the progression of atherosclerosis, accompanied by a decline of Th1 differentiation and reduction of their chemotaxis beyond the endothelium. Thus, oral infection with H. pylori accelerates atherosclerosis in mice and the active immunisation with Hp-HSP60 or the eradication of H. pylori with antibiotics can moderate/prevent cellular immunity, resulting in a reduction of atherosclerosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1154-1168
Number of pages15
JournalLupus
Volume18
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Helicobacter pylori
Cellular Immunity
Atherosclerosis
Chaperonin 60
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Transendothelial and Transepithelial Migration
High Fat Diet
Helicobacter Infections
Apolipoproteins E
Chemotaxis
Endothelium
Immunization
Vaccination
T-Lymphocytes
Infection

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Autoimmunity
  • Heat shock protein 60 (HSP60)
  • Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori
  • Hp)
  • Transendothelial migration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Regulation of cellular immunity prevents Helicobacter pylori-induced atherosclerosis. / Ayada, K.; Yokota, Kenji; Hirai, K.; Fujimoto, K.; Kobayashi, Kazuko; Ogawa, Hiroko; Hatanaka, K.; Hirohata, Satoshi; Yoshino, Tadashi; Shoenfeld, Y.; Matsuura, Eiji; Oguma, K.

In: Lupus, Vol. 18, No. 13, 2009, p. 1154-1168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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