Regulation by carbon dioxide of wound-induced ethylene biosynthesis in tomato pericarp and winter squash mesocarp tissues

Francis M. Mathooko, Yasutaka Kubo, Akitsugu Inaba, Reinosuke Nakamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of CO2 treatment on wound-induced ethylene biosynthesis were investigated in excised pericarp and mesocarp tissues of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. TVR-II) and winter squash (Cucurbita maxima Duch. cv. Ebisu) respectively. Wounding caused increase in ethylene production rate, the levels of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and 1-(malonylamino)cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (MACC) and the activities of ACC synthase and ACC oxidase. The increase in the rate of ethylene production and ACC synthase activity were suppressed by CO2 treatment and was dependent on CO2 concentration. CO2 treatment also suppressed wound-induced increase in ACC level irrespective of the CO2 concentration. The presence of 10% CO2 had no effect on ACC conjugation to MACC induced by wounding while 60% CO2 suppressed almost completely ACC conjugation. CO2 promoted and inhibited induction of ACC oxidase activity in excised tomato and winter squash tissues respectively. These results suggest that CO2 inhibits wound-induced ethylene biosynthesis by reducing the availability of ACC through repression of ACC synthase synthesis and/or inhibition of its activity. Also endogenous ethylene produced in response to wounding may play a role in the regulation of wound-induced ethylene production.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-38
Number of pages12
JournalPostharvest Biology and Technology
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1993

Keywords

  • Ethylene biosynthesis
  • Mesocarp
  • Tomato
  • Winter squash
  • Wound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Horticulture

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