Registry of the Japanese society of lung and heart-lung transplantation: The official Japanese lung transplantation report 2012

Takahiro Oto, Yoshinori Okada, Toru Bando, Masato Minami, Takeshi Shiraishi, Takeshi Nagayasu, Masayuki Chida, Meinoshin Okumura, Hiroshi Date, Shinichiro Miyoshi, Takashi Kondo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Japanese Organ Transplant Law was amended, and the revised law took effect in July 2010 to overcome extreme donor shortage and to increase the availability of donor organs from brain-dead donors. It is now possible to procure organs from children. The year 2011 was the first year that it was possible to examine the results of this first extensive revision of the Japanese Organ Transplant Law, which took effect in 1997. Currently, seven transplant centers, including Tohoku, Dokkyo, Kyoto, Osaka, Okayama, Fukuoka and Nagasaki Universities, are authorized to perform lung transplantation in Japan, and by the end of 2011, a total of 239 lung transplants had been performed. The number of transplants per year and the ratio of brain-dead donor transplants increased dramatically after the revision of the Japanese Organ Transplant Law. The survival rates for lung transplant recipients registered with the Japanese Society for Lung and Heart-lung Transplantation were 93.3 % at 1 month, 91.5 % at 3 months, 86.3 % at 1 year, 79.0 % at 3 years, and 73.1 % at 5 years. The survival curves for brain-dead donor and living-donor lung transplantation were similar. The survival outcomes for both brain-dead and living-donor lung transplants were better than those reported by the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. However, donor shortage remains a limitation of lung transplantation in Japan. The lung transplant centers in Japan should continue to make a special effort to save critically ill patients waiting for lung transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)208-211
Number of pages4
JournalGeneral Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

Fingerprint

Heart-Lung Transplantation
Lung Transplantation
Registries
Transplants
Lung
Brain Death
Tissue Donors
Japan
Living Donors
Survival
Critical Illness
Survival Rate

Keywords

  • Brain-dead donor
  • Japan
  • Living donor
  • Lung transplantation
  • Registry report

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Registry of the Japanese society of lung and heart-lung transplantation : The official Japanese lung transplantation report 2012. / Oto, Takahiro; Okada, Yoshinori; Bando, Toru; Minami, Masato; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Chida, Masayuki; Okumura, Meinoshin; Date, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Kondo, Takashi.

In: General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 61, No. 4, 04.2013, p. 208-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oto, T, Okada, Y, Bando, T, Minami, M, Shiraishi, T, Nagayasu, T, Chida, M, Okumura, M, Date, H, Miyoshi, S & Kondo, T 2013, 'Registry of the Japanese society of lung and heart-lung transplantation: The official Japanese lung transplantation report 2012', General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, vol. 61, no. 4, pp. 208-211. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11748-013-0215-7
Oto, Takahiro ; Okada, Yoshinori ; Bando, Toru ; Minami, Masato ; Shiraishi, Takeshi ; Nagayasu, Takeshi ; Chida, Masayuki ; Okumura, Meinoshin ; Date, Hiroshi ; Miyoshi, Shinichiro ; Kondo, Takashi. / Registry of the Japanese society of lung and heart-lung transplantation : The official Japanese lung transplantation report 2012. In: General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 2013 ; Vol. 61, No. 4. pp. 208-211.
@article{c5c17fc5132641a8bdb252611ce8dfe3,
title = "Registry of the Japanese society of lung and heart-lung transplantation: The official Japanese lung transplantation report 2012",
abstract = "The Japanese Organ Transplant Law was amended, and the revised law took effect in July 2010 to overcome extreme donor shortage and to increase the availability of donor organs from brain-dead donors. It is now possible to procure organs from children. The year 2011 was the first year that it was possible to examine the results of this first extensive revision of the Japanese Organ Transplant Law, which took effect in 1997. Currently, seven transplant centers, including Tohoku, Dokkyo, Kyoto, Osaka, Okayama, Fukuoka and Nagasaki Universities, are authorized to perform lung transplantation in Japan, and by the end of 2011, a total of 239 lung transplants had been performed. The number of transplants per year and the ratio of brain-dead donor transplants increased dramatically after the revision of the Japanese Organ Transplant Law. The survival rates for lung transplant recipients registered with the Japanese Society for Lung and Heart-lung Transplantation were 93.3 {\%} at 1 month, 91.5 {\%} at 3 months, 86.3 {\%} at 1 year, 79.0 {\%} at 3 years, and 73.1 {\%} at 5 years. The survival curves for brain-dead donor and living-donor lung transplantation were similar. The survival outcomes for both brain-dead and living-donor lung transplants were better than those reported by the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. However, donor shortage remains a limitation of lung transplantation in Japan. The lung transplant centers in Japan should continue to make a special effort to save critically ill patients waiting for lung transplantation.",
keywords = "Brain-dead donor, Japan, Living donor, Lung transplantation, Registry report",
author = "Takahiro Oto and Yoshinori Okada and Toru Bando and Masato Minami and Takeshi Shiraishi and Takeshi Nagayasu and Masayuki Chida and Meinoshin Okumura and Hiroshi Date and Shinichiro Miyoshi and Takashi Kondo",
year = "2013",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1007/s11748-013-0215-7",
language = "English",
volume = "61",
pages = "208--211",
journal = "General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery",
issn = "1863-6705",
publisher = "Springer Japan",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Registry of the Japanese society of lung and heart-lung transplantation

T2 - The official Japanese lung transplantation report 2012

AU - Oto, Takahiro

AU - Okada, Yoshinori

AU - Bando, Toru

AU - Minami, Masato

AU - Shiraishi, Takeshi

AU - Nagayasu, Takeshi

AU - Chida, Masayuki

AU - Okumura, Meinoshin

AU - Date, Hiroshi

AU - Miyoshi, Shinichiro

AU - Kondo, Takashi

PY - 2013/4

Y1 - 2013/4

N2 - The Japanese Organ Transplant Law was amended, and the revised law took effect in July 2010 to overcome extreme donor shortage and to increase the availability of donor organs from brain-dead donors. It is now possible to procure organs from children. The year 2011 was the first year that it was possible to examine the results of this first extensive revision of the Japanese Organ Transplant Law, which took effect in 1997. Currently, seven transplant centers, including Tohoku, Dokkyo, Kyoto, Osaka, Okayama, Fukuoka and Nagasaki Universities, are authorized to perform lung transplantation in Japan, and by the end of 2011, a total of 239 lung transplants had been performed. The number of transplants per year and the ratio of brain-dead donor transplants increased dramatically after the revision of the Japanese Organ Transplant Law. The survival rates for lung transplant recipients registered with the Japanese Society for Lung and Heart-lung Transplantation were 93.3 % at 1 month, 91.5 % at 3 months, 86.3 % at 1 year, 79.0 % at 3 years, and 73.1 % at 5 years. The survival curves for brain-dead donor and living-donor lung transplantation were similar. The survival outcomes for both brain-dead and living-donor lung transplants were better than those reported by the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. However, donor shortage remains a limitation of lung transplantation in Japan. The lung transplant centers in Japan should continue to make a special effort to save critically ill patients waiting for lung transplantation.

AB - The Japanese Organ Transplant Law was amended, and the revised law took effect in July 2010 to overcome extreme donor shortage and to increase the availability of donor organs from brain-dead donors. It is now possible to procure organs from children. The year 2011 was the first year that it was possible to examine the results of this first extensive revision of the Japanese Organ Transplant Law, which took effect in 1997. Currently, seven transplant centers, including Tohoku, Dokkyo, Kyoto, Osaka, Okayama, Fukuoka and Nagasaki Universities, are authorized to perform lung transplantation in Japan, and by the end of 2011, a total of 239 lung transplants had been performed. The number of transplants per year and the ratio of brain-dead donor transplants increased dramatically after the revision of the Japanese Organ Transplant Law. The survival rates for lung transplant recipients registered with the Japanese Society for Lung and Heart-lung Transplantation were 93.3 % at 1 month, 91.5 % at 3 months, 86.3 % at 1 year, 79.0 % at 3 years, and 73.1 % at 5 years. The survival curves for brain-dead donor and living-donor lung transplantation were similar. The survival outcomes for both brain-dead and living-donor lung transplants were better than those reported by the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. However, donor shortage remains a limitation of lung transplantation in Japan. The lung transplant centers in Japan should continue to make a special effort to save critically ill patients waiting for lung transplantation.

KW - Brain-dead donor

KW - Japan

KW - Living donor

KW - Lung transplantation

KW - Registry report

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84877876275&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84877876275&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11748-013-0215-7

DO - 10.1007/s11748-013-0215-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 23436117

AN - SCOPUS:84877876275

VL - 61

SP - 208

EP - 211

JO - General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery

JF - General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery

SN - 1863-6705

IS - 4

ER -