Red-shifted chlorophyll a bands allow uphill energy transfer to photosystem II reaction centers in an aerial green alga, Prasiola crispa, harvested in Antarctica

Makiko Kosugi, Shin Ichiro Ozawa, Yuichiro Takahashi, Yasuhiro Kamei, Shigeru Itoh, Sakae Kudoh, Yasuhiro Kashino, Hiroyuki Koike

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

An aerial green alga, Prasiola crispa (Lightf.) Menegh, which is known to form large colonies in Antarctic habitats, is subject to severe environmental stresses due to low temperature, draught and strong sunlight in summer. A considerable light-absorption by long-wavelength chlorophylls (LWC) at around 710 nm, which seem to consist of chlorophyll a, was detected in thallus of P. crispa harvested at a terrestrial environment in Antarctica. Absorption level at 710 nm against that at 680 nm was correlated with fluorescence emission intensity at 713 nm at room temperature and the 77 K fluorescence emission band from LWC was found to be emitted at 735 nm. We demonstrated that the LWC efficiently transfer excitation energy to photosystem II (PSII) reaction center from measurements of action spectra of photosynthetic oxygen evolution and P700 photo-oxidation. The global quantum yield of PSII excitation in thallus by far-red light was shown to be as high as by orange light, and the excitation balance between PSII and PSI was almost same in the two light sources. It is thus proposed that the LWC increase the photosynthetic productivity in the lower parts of overlapping thalli and contribute to the predominance of alga in the severe environment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number148139
JournalBiochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics
Volume1861
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2020

Keywords

  • Antarctica
  • Energy transfer
  • Green algae
  • Long-wavelength chlorophylls
  • Photosynthesis
  • Prasiola crispa

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

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