Recovery from mental ill health in an occupational setting

A cohort study in Japan

Yoshio Mino, Jun Shigemi, Toshihide Tsuda, Nobufumi Yasuda, Akira Babazono, Paul Bebbington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study is to clarify the degree of recovery from mental ill health in occupational settings and the nature of perceived job stress associated with recovery. Methods: A 1-year cohort study was carried out in 287 of 763 workers who scored 8 or more on the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30), and the proportion recovering during the year was compared according to the presence of individual perceived job stress items. To control confounding factors, multiple logistic analysis was used. Results: Recovery from mental ill health was observed in 48.7% after the first 6 months and in 66.1% after 1 year. During the first 6-month period, no identified job stress item was associated with recovery. During the second 6- month period, however, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) between recovery and the absence of perceived job stress was 4.2 (1.3-13.1) for 'Too much responsibility', even after controlling for sex, age, the degree of family life satisfaction, physical health state, and the initial GHQ score. Conclusion: Relief from excessive responsibility might promote recovery in mentally ill workers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)66-71
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Occupational Health
Volume42
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2000

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Mental Health
Japan
Cohort Studies
Health
Recovery
Mentally Ill Persons
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Logistics
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Cohort study
  • Job stress
  • Mental health
  • Recovery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Mino, Y., Shigemi, J., Tsuda, T., Yasuda, N., Babazono, A., & Bebbington, P. (2000). Recovery from mental ill health in an occupational setting: A cohort study in Japan. Journal of Occupational Health, 42(2), 66-71.

Recovery from mental ill health in an occupational setting : A cohort study in Japan. / Mino, Yoshio; Shigemi, Jun; Tsuda, Toshihide; Yasuda, Nobufumi; Babazono, Akira; Bebbington, Paul.

In: Journal of Occupational Health, Vol. 42, No. 2, 03.2000, p. 66-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mino, Y, Shigemi, J, Tsuda, T, Yasuda, N, Babazono, A & Bebbington, P 2000, 'Recovery from mental ill health in an occupational setting: A cohort study in Japan', Journal of Occupational Health, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 66-71.
Mino, Yoshio ; Shigemi, Jun ; Tsuda, Toshihide ; Yasuda, Nobufumi ; Babazono, Akira ; Bebbington, Paul. / Recovery from mental ill health in an occupational setting : A cohort study in Japan. In: Journal of Occupational Health. 2000 ; Vol. 42, No. 2. pp. 66-71.
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