Reactive oxygen species derived from impaired quality control of photosystem II are irrelevant to plasma-membrane NADPH oxidases

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Protein quality control plays an important role in the photosynthetic apparatus because its components receive excess light energy and are susceptible to photooxidative damage. In chloroplasts, photodamage is targeted to the D1 protein of Photosystem II (PSII). The coordinated PSII repair cycle (PSII disassembly, D1 degradation and synthesis, and PSII reassembly) is necessary to mitigate photoinhibition. A thylakoid protease FtsH, which is formed predominantly as a heteromeric complex with two isoforms of FtsH2 and FtsH5 in Arabidopsis, is the major protease involved in PSII repair. A mutant lacking FtsH2 (termed var2) shows compromised D1 degradation. Furthermore, var2 accumulates high levels of chloroplastic reactive oxygen species (cpROS), reflecting photooxidative stress without functional PSII repair. To examine if the cpROS produced in var2 are connected to a ROS signaling pathway mediated by plasma membrane NADPH oxidase (encoded by AtRbohD or AtRbohF), we generated mutants in which either Rboh gene was inactivated under var2 background. Lack of NADPH oxidases had little or no impact on cpROS accumulation. It seems unlikely that cpROS in var2 activate plasma membrane NADPH oxidases to enhance ROS production and the signaling pathway. Mutants that are defective in PSII repair might be valuable for investigating cpROS and their physiological roles.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)264-266
Number of pages3
JournalPlant Signaling and Behavior
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2 2010

Keywords

  • Chloroplast
  • D1 protein
  • FtsH
  • NADPH oxidase
  • Photosystem II repair cycle
  • Protein turnover
  • Reactive oxygen species (ROS)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

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