Rapid evolution of larval development time during mass-rearing in the melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae

Takahisa Miyatake, Masaaki Yamagishi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A quantitative genetic analysis of rapid evolution of a life history trait has been conducted on the first 24 generations of mass-rearing in the melon fly Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae). The phenotypic variance of larval development time in each generation was divided into genetic and residual components. Mean and phenotypic coefficients of variation of larval development time decreased gradually as generations proceeded as a result of artificial selection for shorter larval period in the mass-rearing procedure. There was a trend that additive genetic coefficients of variation in larval development time decreased with generations. These changes are entirely attributed to genetic responses to laboratory selection under the mass-rearing environment because the population was maintained at a very large size so as to exclude random genetic drift and inbreeding depression, which would be other factors responsible for the observed genetic changes. The residual coefficients of variation in larval development time did not change with generations. Realized heritability of larval development time was low. The heritabilities for larval development time estimated from parent-offspring regression at generations 60 and 70, when the evolutionary plateau was asymptotically reached, were not significantly larger than 0.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-297
Number of pages7
JournalResearches on Population Ecology
Volume41
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Diptera
  • Genetic variance
  • Heritability
  • Larval period
  • Selection
  • Tephritidae

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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