Radiofrequency ablation of lung cancer at Okayama university hospital: A review of 10 years of experience

Takao Hirak, Hideo Gobara, Hidefumi Mimura, Shinichi Toyooka, Hiroyasu Fujiwara, Kotaro Yasui, Yoshifumi Sano, Toshihiro Iguchi, Jun Sakura, Nobuhisa Tajirr, Takashi Mukai, Yusuke Matsur, Susumu Kanazawa

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The application of radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of lung cancer by our group at Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences began in June 2001, and in the present report, we review our 10-year experience with this treatment modality at Okayama University Hospital. The local efficacy of radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of lung cancer depends on tumor size and the type of electrode used, but not on tumor type. An important factor for the prevention of local failure may be the acquisition of an adequate ablative margin. The combination of embolization and radiation therapy enhances the local efficacy. Local failure may be salvaged by repeating the radiofrequency ablation, particularly in small tumors. Survival rates after radiofrequency ablation are quite promising for patients with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer and pulmonary metastasis from colorectal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. The complications caused by radiofrequency ablation can be treated conservatively in the majority of cases. However, attention should be paid to rare but serious complications. This review shows that radiofrequency ablation is a promising treatment for patients with lung cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-297
Number of pages11
JournalActa medica Okayama
Volume65
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Complication
  • Local efficacy
  • Lung cancer
  • Radiofrequency ablation
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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