QTL analysis of malting quality in barley based on the doubled-haploid progeny of two elite North American varieties representing different germplasm groups

L. A. Marquez-Cedillo, P. M. Hayes, B. L. Jones, A. Kleinhofs, W. G. Legge, B. C. Rossnagel, K. Sato, E. Ullrich, D. M. Wesenberg

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    118 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Characterization of the determinants of economically important phenotypes showing complex inheritance should lead to the more effective use of genetic resources. This study was conducted to determine the number, genome location and effects of QTLs determining malting quality in the two North American barley quality standards. Using a doubled-haploid population of 140 lines from the cross of HarringtonxMorex, malting quality phenotype data sets from eight environments, and a 107-marker linkage map, QTL analyses were performed using simple interval mapping and simplified composite interval mapping procedures. Seventeen QTLs were associated with seven grain and malting quality traits (percentage of plump kernels, test weight, grain protein percentage, soluble/total protein ratio, α-amylase activity, diastatic power and malt-extract percentage). QTLs for multiple traits were coincident. The loci controlling inflorescence type [vrs1 on chromosome 2(2H) and int-c on chromosome 4(4H)] were coincident with QTLs affecting all traits except malt-extract percentage. The largest effect QTLs, for the percentage of plump kernels, test weight protein percentage, S/T ratio and diastatic power, were coincident with the vrs1 locus. QTL analyses were conducted separately for each sub-population (six-rowed and two-rowed). Eleven new QTLs were detected in the subpopulations. There were significant interactions between the vrs1 and int-c loci for grain-protein percentage and S/T protein ratio. Results suggest that this mating of two different germplasm groups caused a disruption of the balance of traits. Information on the number, position and effects of QTLs determining components of malting quality may be useful for maintaining specific allele configurations that determine target quality profiles.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)173-184
    Number of pages12
    JournalTheoretical and Applied Genetics
    Volume101
    Issue number1-2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2000

    Keywords

    • Hordeum vulgare
    • Quality traits
    • Quantitative trait loci
    • Six-rowed
    • Two-rowed

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biotechnology
    • Agronomy and Crop Science
    • Genetics

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