Pulmonary resection in a prone position for lung cancer invading the spine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The prone position is usually not selected for pulmonary resection. The intraoperative body position is an important issue in surgery for non-small cell lung cancer invading the spine because the standard intraoperative body position for a vertebrectomy is a prone position, while that for a pulmonary resection is a lateral decubitus position. Intraoperative changes in body position can cause several complications. Using an O-arm with a navigation system, a partial vertebrectomy was completed with the patient in a prone position thanks to the recognition of accurate surgical margins in the vertebral body; then, without changing the patient’s body position, a lobectomy with systemic lymph node dissection was performed via a posterior approach. Especially for procedures requiring a wide resection of the chest wall, a prone position can be selected for a lobectomy with systemic lymph node dissection via a posterior approach without any significant difficulties.

Original languageEnglish
JournalGeneral Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Prone Position
Lung Neoplasms
Spine
Lung
Lymph Node Excision
Thoracic Wall
Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Arm

Keywords

  • Lung cancer invading the spine
  • Posterior approach
  • Prone position

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Pulmonary resection in a prone position for lung cancer invading the spine",
abstract = "The prone position is usually not selected for pulmonary resection. The intraoperative body position is an important issue in surgery for non-small cell lung cancer invading the spine because the standard intraoperative body position for a vertebrectomy is a prone position, while that for a pulmonary resection is a lateral decubitus position. Intraoperative changes in body position can cause several complications. Using an O-arm with a navigation system, a partial vertebrectomy was completed with the patient in a prone position thanks to the recognition of accurate surgical margins in the vertebral body; then, without changing the patient’s body position, a lobectomy with systemic lymph node dissection was performed via a posterior approach. Especially for procedures requiring a wide resection of the chest wall, a prone position can be selected for a lobectomy with systemic lymph node dissection via a posterior approach without any significant difficulties.",
keywords = "Lung cancer invading the spine, Posterior approach, Prone position",
author = "Shunsaku Miyauchi and Junichi Sou and Kazuhiko Shien and Masato Tanaka and Hiromasa Yamamoto and Toshihumi Ozaki and Shinichi Toyooka",
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doi = "10.1007/s11748-019-01113-7",
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journal = "General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery",
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AU - Miyauchi, Shunsaku

AU - Sou, Junichi

AU - Shien, Kazuhiko

AU - Tanaka, Masato

AU - Yamamoto, Hiromasa

AU - Ozaki, Toshihumi

AU - Toyooka, Shinichi

PY - 2019/1/1

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N2 - The prone position is usually not selected for pulmonary resection. The intraoperative body position is an important issue in surgery for non-small cell lung cancer invading the spine because the standard intraoperative body position for a vertebrectomy is a prone position, while that for a pulmonary resection is a lateral decubitus position. Intraoperative changes in body position can cause several complications. Using an O-arm with a navigation system, a partial vertebrectomy was completed with the patient in a prone position thanks to the recognition of accurate surgical margins in the vertebral body; then, without changing the patient’s body position, a lobectomy with systemic lymph node dissection was performed via a posterior approach. Especially for procedures requiring a wide resection of the chest wall, a prone position can be selected for a lobectomy with systemic lymph node dissection via a posterior approach without any significant difficulties.

AB - The prone position is usually not selected for pulmonary resection. The intraoperative body position is an important issue in surgery for non-small cell lung cancer invading the spine because the standard intraoperative body position for a vertebrectomy is a prone position, while that for a pulmonary resection is a lateral decubitus position. Intraoperative changes in body position can cause several complications. Using an O-arm with a navigation system, a partial vertebrectomy was completed with the patient in a prone position thanks to the recognition of accurate surgical margins in the vertebral body; then, without changing the patient’s body position, a lobectomy with systemic lymph node dissection was performed via a posterior approach. Especially for procedures requiring a wide resection of the chest wall, a prone position can be selected for a lobectomy with systemic lymph node dissection via a posterior approach without any significant difficulties.

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