Properties of tonic episodes of masseter muscle activity during waking hours and sleep in subjects with and without history of orofacial pain

Acing Habibie Mude, Shigehisa Kawakami, Seiya Kato, Shougo Minagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To provide a scientific data related to the tonic activity of masseter muscle in subjects with and without history of orofacial pain during their normal daily life. Methods: Thirty-three subjects were divided into two groups, a pain history group (PHG) and a non-pain history group (non-PHG), based on their responses to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders questionnaire. After excluding four subjects with incomplete recordings, full-day masseter muscle surface EMGs of 29 subjects (10 men, 19 women; mean age 24.1 years) were analyzed. Tonic episode (TE) was defined as continuous EMG activity with a duration at least 2. s with intensities above twice the baseline noise level. TEs were classified into 6 strength categories (<7.5%, 7.5-10%, 10-15%, 15-25%, 25-40% and >40% of the maximum voluntary clenching (MVC)). The mean duration of activity observed in the non-PHG + 2 SD was adopted as a cutoff for identifying sustained TE. Results: During waking hours, the incidence of sustained TEs was significantly higher in the PHG than in the non-PHG (p <. 0.05). The incidence and total duration of sustained TEs were significantly higher in the PHG than in the non-PHG at intensities of 7.5-10% MVC, 10-15% MVC, and 15-25% MVC (p <. 0.05). No significant difference was observed during sleep. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it would be concluded that sustained TEs may have a correlation with orofacial pain and the intensity range of 7.5-25% MVC would be an important range for future clenching studies.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Prosthodontic Research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Masseter Muscle
Facial Pain
Sleep
History
Pain
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders
Incidence
Noise
Research

Keywords

  • Clenching
  • Electromyography
  • Masseter muscle
  • Orofacial pain
  • Temporomandibular disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oral Surgery
  • Dentistry (miscellaneous)

Cite this

@article{cdacb531305345128d7b3e0a2e689d54,
title = "Properties of tonic episodes of masseter muscle activity during waking hours and sleep in subjects with and without history of orofacial pain",
abstract = "Purpose: To provide a scientific data related to the tonic activity of masseter muscle in subjects with and without history of orofacial pain during their normal daily life. Methods: Thirty-three subjects were divided into two groups, a pain history group (PHG) and a non-pain history group (non-PHG), based on their responses to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders questionnaire. After excluding four subjects with incomplete recordings, full-day masseter muscle surface EMGs of 29 subjects (10 men, 19 women; mean age 24.1 years) were analyzed. Tonic episode (TE) was defined as continuous EMG activity with a duration at least 2. s with intensities above twice the baseline noise level. TEs were classified into 6 strength categories (<7.5{\%}, 7.5-10{\%}, 10-15{\%}, 15-25{\%}, 25-40{\%} and >40{\%} of the maximum voluntary clenching (MVC)). The mean duration of activity observed in the non-PHG + 2 SD was adopted as a cutoff for identifying sustained TE. Results: During waking hours, the incidence of sustained TEs was significantly higher in the PHG than in the non-PHG (p <. 0.05). The incidence and total duration of sustained TEs were significantly higher in the PHG than in the non-PHG at intensities of 7.5-10{\%} MVC, 10-15{\%} MVC, and 15-25{\%} MVC (p <. 0.05). No significant difference was observed during sleep. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it would be concluded that sustained TEs may have a correlation with orofacial pain and the intensity range of 7.5-25{\%} MVC would be an important range for future clenching studies.",
keywords = "Clenching, Electromyography, Masseter muscle, Orofacial pain, Temporomandibular disorders",
author = "Mude, {Acing Habibie} and Shigehisa Kawakami and Seiya Kato and Shougo Minagi",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpor.2017.09.003",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Prosthodontic Research",
issn = "1883-1958",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Properties of tonic episodes of masseter muscle activity during waking hours and sleep in subjects with and without history of orofacial pain

AU - Mude, Acing Habibie

AU - Kawakami, Shigehisa

AU - Kato, Seiya

AU - Minagi, Shougo

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Purpose: To provide a scientific data related to the tonic activity of masseter muscle in subjects with and without history of orofacial pain during their normal daily life. Methods: Thirty-three subjects were divided into two groups, a pain history group (PHG) and a non-pain history group (non-PHG), based on their responses to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders questionnaire. After excluding four subjects with incomplete recordings, full-day masseter muscle surface EMGs of 29 subjects (10 men, 19 women; mean age 24.1 years) were analyzed. Tonic episode (TE) was defined as continuous EMG activity with a duration at least 2. s with intensities above twice the baseline noise level. TEs were classified into 6 strength categories (<7.5%, 7.5-10%, 10-15%, 15-25%, 25-40% and >40% of the maximum voluntary clenching (MVC)). The mean duration of activity observed in the non-PHG + 2 SD was adopted as a cutoff for identifying sustained TE. Results: During waking hours, the incidence of sustained TEs was significantly higher in the PHG than in the non-PHG (p <. 0.05). The incidence and total duration of sustained TEs were significantly higher in the PHG than in the non-PHG at intensities of 7.5-10% MVC, 10-15% MVC, and 15-25% MVC (p <. 0.05). No significant difference was observed during sleep. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it would be concluded that sustained TEs may have a correlation with orofacial pain and the intensity range of 7.5-25% MVC would be an important range for future clenching studies.

AB - Purpose: To provide a scientific data related to the tonic activity of masseter muscle in subjects with and without history of orofacial pain during their normal daily life. Methods: Thirty-three subjects were divided into two groups, a pain history group (PHG) and a non-pain history group (non-PHG), based on their responses to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders questionnaire. After excluding four subjects with incomplete recordings, full-day masseter muscle surface EMGs of 29 subjects (10 men, 19 women; mean age 24.1 years) were analyzed. Tonic episode (TE) was defined as continuous EMG activity with a duration at least 2. s with intensities above twice the baseline noise level. TEs were classified into 6 strength categories (<7.5%, 7.5-10%, 10-15%, 15-25%, 25-40% and >40% of the maximum voluntary clenching (MVC)). The mean duration of activity observed in the non-PHG + 2 SD was adopted as a cutoff for identifying sustained TE. Results: During waking hours, the incidence of sustained TEs was significantly higher in the PHG than in the non-PHG (p <. 0.05). The incidence and total duration of sustained TEs were significantly higher in the PHG than in the non-PHG at intensities of 7.5-10% MVC, 10-15% MVC, and 15-25% MVC (p <. 0.05). No significant difference was observed during sleep. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it would be concluded that sustained TEs may have a correlation with orofacial pain and the intensity range of 7.5-25% MVC would be an important range for future clenching studies.

KW - Clenching

KW - Electromyography

KW - Masseter muscle

KW - Orofacial pain

KW - Temporomandibular disorders

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U2 - 10.1016/j.jpor.2017.09.003

DO - 10.1016/j.jpor.2017.09.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 29126811

AN - SCOPUS:85032947871

JO - Journal of Prosthodontic Research

JF - Journal of Prosthodontic Research

SN - 1883-1958

ER -