Prolonged tachycardia with higher heart rate is associated with higher ICU and in-hospital mortality

Masao Hayashi, Arata Taniguchi, Ryuji Kaku, Shusaku Fujimoto, Satoshi Isoyama, Sei Manabe, Tsubasa Yoshida, Satoshi Suzuki, Kazuyoshi Shimizu, Hiroshi Morimatsu, Ryusuke Momota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Tachycardia is common in intensive care units (ICUs). It is unknown whether tachycardia or prolonged tachycardia affects patient outcomes. We investigated the association between tachycardia and mortality in critically ill patients. This retrospective cohort study's primary outcome was patient mortality in the ICU and the hospital. We stratified the patients (n=476) by heart rate (HR) as LowHR, MediumHR, and HighHR groups. We also stratified them by their durations of HR > 100 (prolonged HR; tachycardia): MildT, ModerateT, and SevereT groups. We determined the six groups' mortality. The ICU mortality rates of the LowHR, MediumHR, and HighHR groups were 1.0%, 1.5%, and 7.9%, respectively; significantly higher in the HighHR vs. LowHR group. The in-hospital mortality rates of these groups were 1%, 4.5%, and 14.6%, respectively; significantly higher in the HighHR vs. LowHR group. The ICU mortality rates of the MildT, ModerateT, and SevereT groups were 0.9%, 5.6%, and 57.1%, respectively. The mortality of the HRT=0 (i.e., all HR ≤ 100) patients was 0%. The in-hospital mortality rates of the MildT, ModerateT, and SevereT groups were 1.8%, 16.7%, and 85.7%, respectively; that of the HRT=0 patients was 0.5%. Both higher HR and prolonged tachycardia were associated with poor outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-153
Number of pages7
JournalActa medica Okayama
Volume73
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

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Intensive care units
Hospital Mortality
Tachycardia
Intensive Care Units
Heart Rate
Mortality
Critical Illness
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies

Keywords

  • ICU
  • In-hospital
  • Mortality
  • Tachycardia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Prolonged tachycardia with higher heart rate is associated with higher ICU and in-hospital mortality. / Hayashi, Masao; Taniguchi, Arata; Kaku, Ryuji; Fujimoto, Shusaku; Isoyama, Satoshi; Manabe, Sei; Yoshida, Tsubasa; Suzuki, Satoshi; Shimizu, Kazuyoshi; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Momota, Ryusuke.

In: Acta medica Okayama, Vol. 73, No. 2, 01.01.2019, p. 147-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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