Prognosis of smokers following resection of pathological stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma

Noriyoshi Sawabata, Shinichiro Miyoshi, Akihide Matsumura, Mitsunori Ohta, Hajime Maeda, Hirofumi Sueki, Masanobu Hayakawa, Meinoshin Okumura, Yoshiki Sawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. Many patients who undergo surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have a smoking habit, which is a risk factor for NSCLC and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In addition, both smoking habits and COPD has been revealed to be a prognostic indicator following surgery for NSCLC. We conducted a multicenter retrospective observational study to address these issues. Methods. Cigarette smoking and airway obstruction severity were chosen as variables to assess overall and disease-specific survival of 169 patients with pathological stage I primary NSCLC (119 stage IA, 50 stage IB) who underwent resection in 2000. Results. The overall 5-year survival rates were 91% for patients who had never smoked (n = 66), 88% for ex-smokers (n = 36), and 72% for current smokers (n = 67) (P = 0.04). The never-smoked group had higher ratios for the factors female, pathological IA, adenocarcinoma, and favorable airway obstruction. In a nested analysis of smokers (ex-smokers and current smokers), smoking status and age were independent factors in a multivariate analysis of disease-specific survival, whereas the degree of airway obstruction was not significant. Conclusion. For smokers who underwent resection of p-stage I NSCLC, current smoking was an unfavorable prognostic factor in an analysis containing the degree of airway obstruction as a variable.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)420-424
Number of pages5
JournalGeneral Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume55
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Airway Obstruction
Smoking
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Habits
Survival
Statistical Factor Analysis
Observational Studies
Adenocarcinoma
Multivariate Analysis
Survival Rate
Retrospective Studies

Keywords

  • COPD
  • Non-small cell lung cancer
  • Smoking
  • Stage I

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Prognosis of smokers following resection of pathological stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma. / Sawabata, Noriyoshi; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Matsumura, Akihide; Ohta, Mitsunori; Maeda, Hajime; Sueki, Hirofumi; Hayakawa, Masanobu; Okumura, Meinoshin; Sawa, Yoshiki.

In: General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 55, No. 10, 10.2007, p. 420-424.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sawabata, N, Miyoshi, S, Matsumura, A, Ohta, M, Maeda, H, Sueki, H, Hayakawa, M, Okumura, M & Sawa, Y 2007, 'Prognosis of smokers following resection of pathological stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma', General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, vol. 55, no. 10, pp. 420-424. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11748-007-0159-x
Sawabata, Noriyoshi ; Miyoshi, Shinichiro ; Matsumura, Akihide ; Ohta, Mitsunori ; Maeda, Hajime ; Sueki, Hirofumi ; Hayakawa, Masanobu ; Okumura, Meinoshin ; Sawa, Yoshiki. / Prognosis of smokers following resection of pathological stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma. In: General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 2007 ; Vol. 55, No. 10. pp. 420-424.
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AU - Miyoshi, Shinichiro

AU - Matsumura, Akihide

AU - Ohta, Mitsunori

AU - Maeda, Hajime

AU - Sueki, Hirofumi

AU - Hayakawa, Masanobu

AU - Okumura, Meinoshin

AU - Sawa, Yoshiki

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N2 - Objective. Many patients who undergo surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have a smoking habit, which is a risk factor for NSCLC and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In addition, both smoking habits and COPD has been revealed to be a prognostic indicator following surgery for NSCLC. We conducted a multicenter retrospective observational study to address these issues. Methods. Cigarette smoking and airway obstruction severity were chosen as variables to assess overall and disease-specific survival of 169 patients with pathological stage I primary NSCLC (119 stage IA, 50 stage IB) who underwent resection in 2000. Results. The overall 5-year survival rates were 91% for patients who had never smoked (n = 66), 88% for ex-smokers (n = 36), and 72% for current smokers (n = 67) (P = 0.04). The never-smoked group had higher ratios for the factors female, pathological IA, adenocarcinoma, and favorable airway obstruction. In a nested analysis of smokers (ex-smokers and current smokers), smoking status and age were independent factors in a multivariate analysis of disease-specific survival, whereas the degree of airway obstruction was not significant. Conclusion. For smokers who underwent resection of p-stage I NSCLC, current smoking was an unfavorable prognostic factor in an analysis containing the degree of airway obstruction as a variable.

AB - Objective. Many patients who undergo surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have a smoking habit, which is a risk factor for NSCLC and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In addition, both smoking habits and COPD has been revealed to be a prognostic indicator following surgery for NSCLC. We conducted a multicenter retrospective observational study to address these issues. Methods. Cigarette smoking and airway obstruction severity were chosen as variables to assess overall and disease-specific survival of 169 patients with pathological stage I primary NSCLC (119 stage IA, 50 stage IB) who underwent resection in 2000. Results. The overall 5-year survival rates were 91% for patients who had never smoked (n = 66), 88% for ex-smokers (n = 36), and 72% for current smokers (n = 67) (P = 0.04). The never-smoked group had higher ratios for the factors female, pathological IA, adenocarcinoma, and favorable airway obstruction. In a nested analysis of smokers (ex-smokers and current smokers), smoking status and age were independent factors in a multivariate analysis of disease-specific survival, whereas the degree of airway obstruction was not significant. Conclusion. For smokers who underwent resection of p-stage I NSCLC, current smoking was an unfavorable prognostic factor in an analysis containing the degree of airway obstruction as a variable.

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