Preferential expression of the gene for a putative inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor homologue in the mushroom bodies of the brain of the worker honeybee Apis mellifera L.

Azusa Kamikouchi, Hideaki Takeuchi, Miyuki Sawata, Kazuaki Ohashi, Shunji Natori, Takeo Kubo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A gene expressed preferentially in the mushroom bodies of the brain of the worker honeybee Apis mellifera L. was identified by the differential display method and its cDNA was isolated. The cDNA fragment of 534 bp (clone A1) contained an open reading frame encoding 177 amino acid residues having 78, 72, 70, 59 and 55% sequence identities with the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors of Drosophila melanogaster, Xenopus laevis and humans (types 1, 2 and 3), respectively, suggesting that it encodes a putative IP3 receptor homologue of the honeybee. In situ hybridization revealed that the gene encoding clone A1 was expressed preferentially in the mushroom bodies and not in the optic lobes, antennal lobes and central bodies; in the mushroom body, it was expressed strongly in the large type Kenyon cells and weakly in the small type Kenyon cells. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the gene was expressed strongly in the head and weakly in the antennae, legs, thorax, and abdomen. These results suggest that the A1 gene product plays a crucial role in neural transmission in the mushroom bodies of the worker bee brain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)181-186
Number of pages6
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume242
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 6 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mushroom Bodies
Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptors
Bees
Brain
Genes
Gene Expression
Complementary DNA
Gene encoding
Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate
Clone Cells
Polymerase chain reaction
Transcription
Optics
Xenopus laevis
Drosophila melanogaster
Display devices
Synaptic Transmission
Abdomen
Antennas
Open Reading Frames

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Preferential expression of the gene for a putative inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor homologue in the mushroom bodies of the brain of the worker honeybee Apis mellifera L. / Kamikouchi, Azusa; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Sawata, Miyuki; Ohashi, Kazuaki; Natori, Shunji; Kubo, Takeo.

In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, Vol. 242, No. 1, 06.01.1998, p. 181-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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