Prediction of response to remission induction therapy by gene expression profiling of peripheral blood in Japanese patients with microscopic polyangiitis

Research Committee of the Intractable Vasculitis Syndrome and the Research Committee of the Intractable Renal Disease of the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), which is classified as an anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated small vessel vasculitis, is one of the most frequent primary vasculitides in Japan. We earlier nominated 16 genes (IRF7, IFIT1, IFIT5, OASL, CLC, GBP-1, PSMB9, HERC5, CCR1, CD36, MS4A4A, BIRC4BP, PLSCR1, DEFA1/DEFA3, DEFA4, and COL9A2) as predictors of response to remission induction therapy against MPA. The aim of this study is to determine the accuracy of prediction using these 16 predictors. Methods: Thirty-nine MPA patients were selected randomly and retrospectively from the Japanese nationwide RemIT-JAV-RPGN cohort and enrolled in this study. Remission induction therapy was conducted according to the Guidelines of Treatment for ANCA-Associated Vasculitis published by the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan. Response to remission induction therapy was predicted by profiling the altered expressions of the 16 predictors between the period before and 1 week after the beginning of treatment. Remission is defined as the absence of clinical manifestations of active vasculitis (Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score 2003: 0 or 1 point). Persistent remission for 18 months is regarded as a "good response," whereas no remission or relapse after remission is regarded as a "poor response." Results: "Poor" and "good" responses were predicted in 7 and 32 patients, respectively. Five out of 7 patients with "poor" prediction and 1 out of 32 patients with "good" prediction experienced relapse after remission. One out of 7 patients with "poor" prediction was not conducted to remission. Accordingly, the sensitivity and specificity to predict poor response was 85.7% (6/7) and 96.9% (31/32), respectively. Conclusions: Response to remission induction therapy can be predicted by monitoring the altered expressions of the 16 predictors in the peripheral blood at an early point of treatment in MPA patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article number117
JournalArthritis Research and Therapy
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 31 2017

Fingerprint

Microscopic Polyangiitis
Remission Induction
Gene Expression Profiling
Vasculitis
Therapeutics
Japan
Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis
Recurrence
Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies
Guidelines
Sensitivity and Specificity
Health

Keywords

  • Gene profiling
  • Microscopic polyangiitis
  • Peripheral blood
  • Prediction of response to treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Research Committee of the Intractable Vasculitis Syndrome and the Research Committee of the Intractable Renal Disease of the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan (2017). Prediction of response to remission induction therapy by gene expression profiling of peripheral blood in Japanese patients with microscopic polyangiitis. Arthritis Research and Therapy, 19(1), [117]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13075-017-1328-7

Prediction of response to remission induction therapy by gene expression profiling of peripheral blood in Japanese patients with microscopic polyangiitis. / Research Committee of the Intractable Vasculitis Syndrome and the Research Committee of the Intractable Renal Disease of the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan.

In: Arthritis Research and Therapy, Vol. 19, No. 1, 117, 31.05.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Research Committee of the Intractable Vasculitis Syndrome and the Research Committee of the Intractable Renal Disease of the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan 2017, 'Prediction of response to remission induction therapy by gene expression profiling of peripheral blood in Japanese patients with microscopic polyangiitis', Arthritis Research and Therapy, vol. 19, no. 1, 117. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13075-017-1328-7
Research Committee of the Intractable Vasculitis Syndrome and the Research Committee of the Intractable Renal Disease of the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan. Prediction of response to remission induction therapy by gene expression profiling of peripheral blood in Japanese patients with microscopic polyangiitis. Arthritis Research and Therapy. 2017 May 31;19(1). 117. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13075-017-1328-7
Research Committee of the Intractable Vasculitis Syndrome and the Research Committee of the Intractable Renal Disease of the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan. / Prediction of response to remission induction therapy by gene expression profiling of peripheral blood in Japanese patients with microscopic polyangiitis. In: Arthritis Research and Therapy. 2017 ; Vol. 19, No. 1.
@article{f5060506898d48099dd2f07859fe8e90,
title = "Prediction of response to remission induction therapy by gene expression profiling of peripheral blood in Japanese patients with microscopic polyangiitis",
abstract = "Background: Microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), which is classified as an anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated small vessel vasculitis, is one of the most frequent primary vasculitides in Japan. We earlier nominated 16 genes (IRF7, IFIT1, IFIT5, OASL, CLC, GBP-1, PSMB9, HERC5, CCR1, CD36, MS4A4A, BIRC4BP, PLSCR1, DEFA1/DEFA3, DEFA4, and COL9A2) as predictors of response to remission induction therapy against MPA. The aim of this study is to determine the accuracy of prediction using these 16 predictors. Methods: Thirty-nine MPA patients were selected randomly and retrospectively from the Japanese nationwide RemIT-JAV-RPGN cohort and enrolled in this study. Remission induction therapy was conducted according to the Guidelines of Treatment for ANCA-Associated Vasculitis published by the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan. Response to remission induction therapy was predicted by profiling the altered expressions of the 16 predictors between the period before and 1 week after the beginning of treatment. Remission is defined as the absence of clinical manifestations of active vasculitis (Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score 2003: 0 or 1 point). Persistent remission for 18 months is regarded as a {"}good response,{"} whereas no remission or relapse after remission is regarded as a {"}poor response.{"} Results: {"}Poor{"} and {"}good{"} responses were predicted in 7 and 32 patients, respectively. Five out of 7 patients with {"}poor{"} prediction and 1 out of 32 patients with {"}good{"} prediction experienced relapse after remission. One out of 7 patients with {"}poor{"} prediction was not conducted to remission. Accordingly, the sensitivity and specificity to predict poor response was 85.7{\%} (6/7) and 96.9{\%} (31/32), respectively. Conclusions: Response to remission induction therapy can be predicted by monitoring the altered expressions of the 16 predictors in the peripheral blood at an early point of treatment in MPA patients.",
keywords = "Gene profiling, Microscopic polyangiitis, Peripheral blood, Prediction of response to treatment",
author = "{Research Committee of the Intractable Vasculitis Syndrome and the Research Committee of the Intractable Renal Disease of the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan} and Akihiro Ishizu and Utano Tomaru and Sakiko Masuda and Kenei Sada and Koichi Amano and Masayoshi Harigai and Yasushi Kawaguchi and Yoshihiro Arimura and Kunihiro Yamagata and Shoichi Ozaki and Hiroaki Dobashi and Sakae Homma and Yasunori Okada and Hitoshi Sugiyama and Joichi Usui and Naotake Tsuboi and Seiichi Matsuo and Hirofumi Makino",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1186/s13075-017-1328-7",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
journal = "Arthritis Research and Therapy",
issn = "1478-6354",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prediction of response to remission induction therapy by gene expression profiling of peripheral blood in Japanese patients with microscopic polyangiitis

AU - Research Committee of the Intractable Vasculitis Syndrome and the Research Committee of the Intractable Renal Disease of the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan

AU - Ishizu, Akihiro

AU - Tomaru, Utano

AU - Masuda, Sakiko

AU - Sada, Kenei

AU - Amano, Koichi

AU - Harigai, Masayoshi

AU - Kawaguchi, Yasushi

AU - Arimura, Yoshihiro

AU - Yamagata, Kunihiro

AU - Ozaki, Shoichi

AU - Dobashi, Hiroaki

AU - Homma, Sakae

AU - Okada, Yasunori

AU - Sugiyama, Hitoshi

AU - Usui, Joichi

AU - Tsuboi, Naotake

AU - Matsuo, Seiichi

AU - Makino, Hirofumi

PY - 2017/5/31

Y1 - 2017/5/31

N2 - Background: Microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), which is classified as an anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated small vessel vasculitis, is one of the most frequent primary vasculitides in Japan. We earlier nominated 16 genes (IRF7, IFIT1, IFIT5, OASL, CLC, GBP-1, PSMB9, HERC5, CCR1, CD36, MS4A4A, BIRC4BP, PLSCR1, DEFA1/DEFA3, DEFA4, and COL9A2) as predictors of response to remission induction therapy against MPA. The aim of this study is to determine the accuracy of prediction using these 16 predictors. Methods: Thirty-nine MPA patients were selected randomly and retrospectively from the Japanese nationwide RemIT-JAV-RPGN cohort and enrolled in this study. Remission induction therapy was conducted according to the Guidelines of Treatment for ANCA-Associated Vasculitis published by the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan. Response to remission induction therapy was predicted by profiling the altered expressions of the 16 predictors between the period before and 1 week after the beginning of treatment. Remission is defined as the absence of clinical manifestations of active vasculitis (Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score 2003: 0 or 1 point). Persistent remission for 18 months is regarded as a "good response," whereas no remission or relapse after remission is regarded as a "poor response." Results: "Poor" and "good" responses were predicted in 7 and 32 patients, respectively. Five out of 7 patients with "poor" prediction and 1 out of 32 patients with "good" prediction experienced relapse after remission. One out of 7 patients with "poor" prediction was not conducted to remission. Accordingly, the sensitivity and specificity to predict poor response was 85.7% (6/7) and 96.9% (31/32), respectively. Conclusions: Response to remission induction therapy can be predicted by monitoring the altered expressions of the 16 predictors in the peripheral blood at an early point of treatment in MPA patients.

AB - Background: Microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), which is classified as an anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated small vessel vasculitis, is one of the most frequent primary vasculitides in Japan. We earlier nominated 16 genes (IRF7, IFIT1, IFIT5, OASL, CLC, GBP-1, PSMB9, HERC5, CCR1, CD36, MS4A4A, BIRC4BP, PLSCR1, DEFA1/DEFA3, DEFA4, and COL9A2) as predictors of response to remission induction therapy against MPA. The aim of this study is to determine the accuracy of prediction using these 16 predictors. Methods: Thirty-nine MPA patients were selected randomly and retrospectively from the Japanese nationwide RemIT-JAV-RPGN cohort and enrolled in this study. Remission induction therapy was conducted according to the Guidelines of Treatment for ANCA-Associated Vasculitis published by the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare of Japan. Response to remission induction therapy was predicted by profiling the altered expressions of the 16 predictors between the period before and 1 week after the beginning of treatment. Remission is defined as the absence of clinical manifestations of active vasculitis (Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score 2003: 0 or 1 point). Persistent remission for 18 months is regarded as a "good response," whereas no remission or relapse after remission is regarded as a "poor response." Results: "Poor" and "good" responses were predicted in 7 and 32 patients, respectively. Five out of 7 patients with "poor" prediction and 1 out of 32 patients with "good" prediction experienced relapse after remission. One out of 7 patients with "poor" prediction was not conducted to remission. Accordingly, the sensitivity and specificity to predict poor response was 85.7% (6/7) and 96.9% (31/32), respectively. Conclusions: Response to remission induction therapy can be predicted by monitoring the altered expressions of the 16 predictors in the peripheral blood at an early point of treatment in MPA patients.

KW - Gene profiling

KW - Microscopic polyangiitis

KW - Peripheral blood

KW - Prediction of response to treatment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85020054415&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85020054415&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s13075-017-1328-7

DO - 10.1186/s13075-017-1328-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 28569178

AN - SCOPUS:85020054415

VL - 19

JO - Arthritis Research and Therapy

JF - Arthritis Research and Therapy

SN - 1478-6354

IS - 1

M1 - 117

ER -