Possible promotion of neuronal differentiation in fetal rat brain neural progenitor cells after sustained exposure to static magnetism

Noritaka Nakamichi, Yukichi Ishioka, Takao Hirai, Shusuke Ozawa, Masaki Tachibana, Nobuhiro Nakamura, Takeshi Takarada, Yukio Yoneda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have previously shown significant potentiation of Ca2+ influx mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, along with decreased microtubules-associated protein-2 (MAP2) expression, in hippocampal neurons cultured under static magnetism without cell death. In this study, we investigated the effects of static magnetism on the functionality of neural progenitor cells endowed to proliferate for self-replication and differentiate into neuronal, astroglial, and oligodendroglial lineages. Neural progenitor cells were isolated from embryonic rat neocortex and hippocampus, followed by culture under static magnetism at 100 mT and subsequent determination of the number of cells immunoreactive for a marker protein of particular progeny lineages. Static magnetism not only significantly decreased proliferation of neural progenitor cells without affecting cell viability, but also promoted differentiation into cells immunoreactive for MAP2 with a concomitant decrease in that for an astroglial marker, irrespective of the presence of differentiation inducers. In neural progenitors cultured under static magnetism, a significant increase was seen in mRNA expression of several activator-type proneural genes, such as Mash1, Math1, and Math3, together with decreased mRNA expression of the repressor type Hes5. These results suggest that sustained static magnetism could suppress proliferation for self-renewal and facilitate differentiation into neurons through promoted expression of activator-type proneural genes by progenitor cells in fetal rat brain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2406-2417
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Research
Volume87
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 15 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Stem Cells
Microtubule-Associated Proteins
Brain
Neurons
Messenger RNA
Neocortex
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Genes
Cell Differentiation
Hippocampus
Cell Survival
Cell Death
Cell Count
Proteins

Keywords

  • Neural progenitor cells
  • Neuronal differentiation
  • Neurospheres
  • Proneural genes
  • Static magnetism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Possible promotion of neuronal differentiation in fetal rat brain neural progenitor cells after sustained exposure to static magnetism. / Nakamichi, Noritaka; Ishioka, Yukichi; Hirai, Takao; Ozawa, Shusuke; Tachibana, Masaki; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Takarada, Takeshi; Yoneda, Yukio.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Research, Vol. 87, No. 11, 15.08.2009, p. 2406-2417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nakamichi, Noritaka ; Ishioka, Yukichi ; Hirai, Takao ; Ozawa, Shusuke ; Tachibana, Masaki ; Nakamura, Nobuhiro ; Takarada, Takeshi ; Yoneda, Yukio. / Possible promotion of neuronal differentiation in fetal rat brain neural progenitor cells after sustained exposure to static magnetism. In: Journal of Neuroscience Research. 2009 ; Vol. 87, No. 11. pp. 2406-2417.
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