Positive baseline behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia predict a subsequent cognitive impairment in cognitively normal population

Keiichiro Tsunoda, Toru Yamashita, Yosuke Osakada, Ryo Sasaki, Koh Tadokoro, Namiko Matsumoto, Emi Nomura, Noriko Hatanaka, Kota Sato, Mami Takemoto, Nozomi Hishikawa, Yasuyuki Ohta, Koji Abe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Because behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are sometimes prodromal symptoms of dementia, it is important to investigate the relationship between BPSD and subsequent cognitive decline. Methods: We examined the cognitive and affective functions of 76 cognitively normal subjects at initial assessment (baseline) and 1-year follow-up. Cognitive function was assessed using clinical dementia rating (CDR) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and affective function was assessed using Abe's BPSD score (ABS) and mild behavioral impairment (MBI). Results: Although there was no change in MMSE, ABS, or MBI after 1 year, the mean CDR score of 0 at baseline increased to 0.1 ± 0.2 at 1-year follow-up (**P < 0.01 vs baseline). No significant change in MMSE was found in both baseline ABS and MBI positive- or negative-groups. In contrast, baseline MBI-dependent CDR change showed a 13.2% of worsening in MBI-negative subjects and a 62.5% of MBI-positive subjects (††P < 0.01), but ABS not. Conclusion: The present data indicate that positive baseline BPSD with MBI was closely related to a subsequent CDR exacerbation. Examining BPSD may be useful for screening cognitively normal population for subsequent dementia development in local communities.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNeurology and Clinical Neuroscience
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • affective symptoms
  • behavioral symptoms
  • cognitive dysfunction
  • cohort study
  • dementia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

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