Population-based longitudinal study showed that children born small for gestational age faced a higher risk of hospitalisation during early childhood

Junko Yoshimoto, Takashi Yorifuji, Yousuke Washio, Tomoka Okamura, Hirokazu Watanabe, Hiroyuki Doi, Hirokazu Tsukahara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: We examined the effects of being born small for gestational age (SGA) on the risk of being hospitalised for common diseases during childhood. Methods: This Japanese nationwide, population-based longitudinal survey followed babies born before 42 weeks of gestation from 10 to 17 January and from 10 to 17 July 2001, using data from the Government's Longitudinal Survey of Babies in the 21st Century. Our study followed 41 268 children until 5.5 years of age: 39 107 full term (8.7% SGA) and 2161 preterm (15.5% SGA). We evaluated the relationship between SGA status and hospitalisation using their history of hospitalisation for common diseases and comparing full-term or preterm births. Logistic regression analysis, adjusted for potential confounders, estimated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: The full-term and preterm children who were born SGA were more likely to be hospitalised during infancy and early childhood than those born non SGA. The ORs for hospitalisation from six months to 18 months of age were 1.23 (95% CI: 1.10–1.37) for full-term and 1.67 (95% CI: 1.23–2.25) for preterm subjects. Higher risks of hospitalisation due to bronchitis, pneumonia, bronchial asthma and diarrhoea were also observed. Conclusion: Being born SGA was associated with all-cause and cause-specific hospitalisation in early childhood, particularly for term infants.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Gestational Age
Longitudinal Studies
Hospitalization
Population
Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Term Birth
Bronchitis
Premature Birth
Diarrhea
Pneumonia
Asthma
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • Common childhood diseases
  • Hospitalisation
  • Longitudinal study
  • Preterm infants
  • Small for gestational age infants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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title = "Population-based longitudinal study showed that children born small for gestational age faced a higher risk of hospitalisation during early childhood",
abstract = "Aim: We examined the effects of being born small for gestational age (SGA) on the risk of being hospitalised for common diseases during childhood. Methods: This Japanese nationwide, population-based longitudinal survey followed babies born before 42 weeks of gestation from 10 to 17 January and from 10 to 17 July 2001, using data from the Government's Longitudinal Survey of Babies in the 21st Century. Our study followed 41 268 children until 5.5 years of age: 39 107 full term (8.7{\%} SGA) and 2161 preterm (15.5{\%} SGA). We evaluated the relationship between SGA status and hospitalisation using their history of hospitalisation for common diseases and comparing full-term or preterm births. Logistic regression analysis, adjusted for potential confounders, estimated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs). Results: The full-term and preterm children who were born SGA were more likely to be hospitalised during infancy and early childhood than those born non SGA. The ORs for hospitalisation from six months to 18 months of age were 1.23 (95{\%} CI: 1.10–1.37) for full-term and 1.67 (95{\%} CI: 1.23–2.25) for preterm subjects. Higher risks of hospitalisation due to bronchitis, pneumonia, bronchial asthma and diarrhoea were also observed. Conclusion: Being born SGA was associated with all-cause and cause-specific hospitalisation in early childhood, particularly for term infants.",
keywords = "Common childhood diseases, Hospitalisation, Longitudinal study, Preterm infants, Small for gestational age infants",
author = "Junko Yoshimoto and Takashi Yorifuji and Yousuke Washio and Tomoka Okamura and Hirokazu Watanabe and Hiroyuki Doi and Hirokazu Tsukahara",
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T1 - Population-based longitudinal study showed that children born small for gestational age faced a higher risk of hospitalisation during early childhood

AU - Yoshimoto, Junko

AU - Yorifuji, Takashi

AU - Washio, Yousuke

AU - Okamura, Tomoka

AU - Watanabe, Hirokazu

AU - Doi, Hiroyuki

AU - Tsukahara, Hirokazu

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Aim: We examined the effects of being born small for gestational age (SGA) on the risk of being hospitalised for common diseases during childhood. Methods: This Japanese nationwide, population-based longitudinal survey followed babies born before 42 weeks of gestation from 10 to 17 January and from 10 to 17 July 2001, using data from the Government's Longitudinal Survey of Babies in the 21st Century. Our study followed 41 268 children until 5.5 years of age: 39 107 full term (8.7% SGA) and 2161 preterm (15.5% SGA). We evaluated the relationship between SGA status and hospitalisation using their history of hospitalisation for common diseases and comparing full-term or preterm births. Logistic regression analysis, adjusted for potential confounders, estimated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: The full-term and preterm children who were born SGA were more likely to be hospitalised during infancy and early childhood than those born non SGA. The ORs for hospitalisation from six months to 18 months of age were 1.23 (95% CI: 1.10–1.37) for full-term and 1.67 (95% CI: 1.23–2.25) for preterm subjects. Higher risks of hospitalisation due to bronchitis, pneumonia, bronchial asthma and diarrhoea were also observed. Conclusion: Being born SGA was associated with all-cause and cause-specific hospitalisation in early childhood, particularly for term infants.

AB - Aim: We examined the effects of being born small for gestational age (SGA) on the risk of being hospitalised for common diseases during childhood. Methods: This Japanese nationwide, population-based longitudinal survey followed babies born before 42 weeks of gestation from 10 to 17 January and from 10 to 17 July 2001, using data from the Government's Longitudinal Survey of Babies in the 21st Century. Our study followed 41 268 children until 5.5 years of age: 39 107 full term (8.7% SGA) and 2161 preterm (15.5% SGA). We evaluated the relationship between SGA status and hospitalisation using their history of hospitalisation for common diseases and comparing full-term or preterm births. Logistic regression analysis, adjusted for potential confounders, estimated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: The full-term and preterm children who were born SGA were more likely to be hospitalised during infancy and early childhood than those born non SGA. The ORs for hospitalisation from six months to 18 months of age were 1.23 (95% CI: 1.10–1.37) for full-term and 1.67 (95% CI: 1.23–2.25) for preterm subjects. Higher risks of hospitalisation due to bronchitis, pneumonia, bronchial asthma and diarrhoea were also observed. Conclusion: Being born SGA was associated with all-cause and cause-specific hospitalisation in early childhood, particularly for term infants.

KW - Common childhood diseases

KW - Hospitalisation

KW - Longitudinal study

KW - Preterm infants

KW - Small for gestational age infants

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