Population-based genetic alterations in Ewing's tumors from Japanese and European Caucasian patients

Toshihumi Ozaki, K. L. Schaefer, D. Wai, R. Yokoyama, S. Ahrens, R. Diallo, T. Hasegawa, T. Shimoda, S. Hirohashi, A. Kawai, N. Naito, Y. Morimoto, H. Inoue, W. Boecker, H. Juergens, W. Winkelmann, B. Dockhorn-Dworniczak, C. Poremba

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Abstract

Background: The incidence of Ewing's tumors (ETs) is lower in Asians or African-Americans than in Caucasians. Patients and methods: Japanese ETs were available for analysis of chromosomal aberrations by comparative genomic hybridization (n = 16) and for expression of chimeric EWS transcripts by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (n = 11). These results, in Japanese patients were compared with those of 62 ETs in European Caucasian patients registered in the European Intergroup Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study. Results: Japanese patients with ET had lower overall survival (P = 0.0446) and relapse-free survival (P = 0.0371) compared with European Caucasian patients. Ten of 11 Japanese ETs and 31 of 62 European Caucasian ETs had type I (EWS exon 7 to FLI1 exon 6) fusion transcripts. In Japanese ETs, the median numbers of chromosomal aberrations were 2.0 and 6.0 in 11 primary tumors and five relapsed tumors, respectively. In European Caucasian ETs, the median number of changes were 2.5 and 5.0 in 52 primary and 10 relapsed tumors, respectively. Frequent gains were 8q (38%), 8p (31%) and 12q (25%) in Japanese ETs and 8q (52%), 8p (48%) and 12q (19%) in European Caucasian ETs. Frequent losses were l9q (44%), 19p (38%) and 17p (25%) in Japanese ETs and 16q (21%), 19q (18%) and 17p (15%) in European Caucasian ETs. The incidence of losses of 19p (P = 0.0215) and 19q (P = 0.0277) were significantly higher in Japanese ETs than in European Caucasian ETs. An amplification (1p33-p34) was observed in only one Japanese ET. Conclusions: Japanese patients with ET in this study had a worse prognosis than European Caucasian patients. In molecular genetic analyses, Japanese ETs had a higher frequency of loss of chromosome 19 than European Caucasian ETs. Different genetic aberrations may explain the different incidences and prognoses of ET between Caucasian and Japanese patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1656-1664
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Oncology
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2002

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Ewing's Sarcoma
Population Genetics
Chromosome Aberrations
Exons
Incidence
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 19
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • c-erbB-2
  • Caucasian
  • Chromosomal aberrations
  • Comparative genomic hybridization
  • Ewing's tumor prognosis
  • Japanese

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Ozaki, T., Schaefer, K. L., Wai, D., Yokoyama, R., Ahrens, S., Diallo, R., ... Poremba, C. (2002). Population-based genetic alterations in Ewing's tumors from Japanese and European Caucasian patients. Annals of Oncology, 13(10), 1656-1664. https://doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdf218

Population-based genetic alterations in Ewing's tumors from Japanese and European Caucasian patients. / Ozaki, Toshihumi; Schaefer, K. L.; Wai, D.; Yokoyama, R.; Ahrens, S.; Diallo, R.; Hasegawa, T.; Shimoda, T.; Hirohashi, S.; Kawai, A.; Naito, N.; Morimoto, Y.; Inoue, H.; Boecker, W.; Juergens, H.; Winkelmann, W.; Dockhorn-Dworniczak, B.; Poremba, C.

In: Annals of Oncology, Vol. 13, No. 10, 01.10.2002, p. 1656-1664.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ozaki, T, Schaefer, KL, Wai, D, Yokoyama, R, Ahrens, S, Diallo, R, Hasegawa, T, Shimoda, T, Hirohashi, S, Kawai, A, Naito, N, Morimoto, Y, Inoue, H, Boecker, W, Juergens, H, Winkelmann, W, Dockhorn-Dworniczak, B & Poremba, C 2002, 'Population-based genetic alterations in Ewing's tumors from Japanese and European Caucasian patients', Annals of Oncology, vol. 13, no. 10, pp. 1656-1664. https://doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdf218
Ozaki, Toshihumi ; Schaefer, K. L. ; Wai, D. ; Yokoyama, R. ; Ahrens, S. ; Diallo, R. ; Hasegawa, T. ; Shimoda, T. ; Hirohashi, S. ; Kawai, A. ; Naito, N. ; Morimoto, Y. ; Inoue, H. ; Boecker, W. ; Juergens, H. ; Winkelmann, W. ; Dockhorn-Dworniczak, B. ; Poremba, C. / Population-based genetic alterations in Ewing's tumors from Japanese and European Caucasian patients. In: Annals of Oncology. 2002 ; Vol. 13, No. 10. pp. 1656-1664.
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abstract = "Background: The incidence of Ewing's tumors (ETs) is lower in Asians or African-Americans than in Caucasians. Patients and methods: Japanese ETs were available for analysis of chromosomal aberrations by comparative genomic hybridization (n = 16) and for expression of chimeric EWS transcripts by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (n = 11). These results, in Japanese patients were compared with those of 62 ETs in European Caucasian patients registered in the European Intergroup Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study. Results: Japanese patients with ET had lower overall survival (P = 0.0446) and relapse-free survival (P = 0.0371) compared with European Caucasian patients. Ten of 11 Japanese ETs and 31 of 62 European Caucasian ETs had type I (EWS exon 7 to FLI1 exon 6) fusion transcripts. In Japanese ETs, the median numbers of chromosomal aberrations were 2.0 and 6.0 in 11 primary tumors and five relapsed tumors, respectively. In European Caucasian ETs, the median number of changes were 2.5 and 5.0 in 52 primary and 10 relapsed tumors, respectively. Frequent gains were 8q (38{\%}), 8p (31{\%}) and 12q (25{\%}) in Japanese ETs and 8q (52{\%}), 8p (48{\%}) and 12q (19{\%}) in European Caucasian ETs. Frequent losses were l9q (44{\%}), 19p (38{\%}) and 17p (25{\%}) in Japanese ETs and 16q (21{\%}), 19q (18{\%}) and 17p (15{\%}) in European Caucasian ETs. The incidence of losses of 19p (P = 0.0215) and 19q (P = 0.0277) were significantly higher in Japanese ETs than in European Caucasian ETs. An amplification (1p33-p34) was observed in only one Japanese ET. Conclusions: Japanese patients with ET in this study had a worse prognosis than European Caucasian patients. In molecular genetic analyses, Japanese ETs had a higher frequency of loss of chromosome 19 than European Caucasian ETs. Different genetic aberrations may explain the different incidences and prognoses of ET between Caucasian and Japanese patients.",
keywords = "c-erbB-2, Caucasian, Chromosomal aberrations, Comparative genomic hybridization, Ewing's tumor prognosis, Japanese",
author = "Toshihumi Ozaki and Schaefer, {K. L.} and D. Wai and R. Yokoyama and S. Ahrens and R. Diallo and T. Hasegawa and T. Shimoda and S. Hirohashi and A. Kawai and N. Naito and Y. Morimoto and H. Inoue and W. Boecker and H. Juergens and W. Winkelmann and B. Dockhorn-Dworniczak and C. Poremba",
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T1 - Population-based genetic alterations in Ewing's tumors from Japanese and European Caucasian patients

AU - Ozaki, Toshihumi

AU - Schaefer, K. L.

AU - Wai, D.

AU - Yokoyama, R.

AU - Ahrens, S.

AU - Diallo, R.

AU - Hasegawa, T.

AU - Shimoda, T.

AU - Hirohashi, S.

AU - Kawai, A.

AU - Naito, N.

AU - Morimoto, Y.

AU - Inoue, H.

AU - Boecker, W.

AU - Juergens, H.

AU - Winkelmann, W.

AU - Dockhorn-Dworniczak, B.

AU - Poremba, C.

PY - 2002/10/1

Y1 - 2002/10/1

N2 - Background: The incidence of Ewing's tumors (ETs) is lower in Asians or African-Americans than in Caucasians. Patients and methods: Japanese ETs were available for analysis of chromosomal aberrations by comparative genomic hybridization (n = 16) and for expression of chimeric EWS transcripts by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (n = 11). These results, in Japanese patients were compared with those of 62 ETs in European Caucasian patients registered in the European Intergroup Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study. Results: Japanese patients with ET had lower overall survival (P = 0.0446) and relapse-free survival (P = 0.0371) compared with European Caucasian patients. Ten of 11 Japanese ETs and 31 of 62 European Caucasian ETs had type I (EWS exon 7 to FLI1 exon 6) fusion transcripts. In Japanese ETs, the median numbers of chromosomal aberrations were 2.0 and 6.0 in 11 primary tumors and five relapsed tumors, respectively. In European Caucasian ETs, the median number of changes were 2.5 and 5.0 in 52 primary and 10 relapsed tumors, respectively. Frequent gains were 8q (38%), 8p (31%) and 12q (25%) in Japanese ETs and 8q (52%), 8p (48%) and 12q (19%) in European Caucasian ETs. Frequent losses were l9q (44%), 19p (38%) and 17p (25%) in Japanese ETs and 16q (21%), 19q (18%) and 17p (15%) in European Caucasian ETs. The incidence of losses of 19p (P = 0.0215) and 19q (P = 0.0277) were significantly higher in Japanese ETs than in European Caucasian ETs. An amplification (1p33-p34) was observed in only one Japanese ET. Conclusions: Japanese patients with ET in this study had a worse prognosis than European Caucasian patients. In molecular genetic analyses, Japanese ETs had a higher frequency of loss of chromosome 19 than European Caucasian ETs. Different genetic aberrations may explain the different incidences and prognoses of ET between Caucasian and Japanese patients.

AB - Background: The incidence of Ewing's tumors (ETs) is lower in Asians or African-Americans than in Caucasians. Patients and methods: Japanese ETs were available for analysis of chromosomal aberrations by comparative genomic hybridization (n = 16) and for expression of chimeric EWS transcripts by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (n = 11). These results, in Japanese patients were compared with those of 62 ETs in European Caucasian patients registered in the European Intergroup Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study. Results: Japanese patients with ET had lower overall survival (P = 0.0446) and relapse-free survival (P = 0.0371) compared with European Caucasian patients. Ten of 11 Japanese ETs and 31 of 62 European Caucasian ETs had type I (EWS exon 7 to FLI1 exon 6) fusion transcripts. In Japanese ETs, the median numbers of chromosomal aberrations were 2.0 and 6.0 in 11 primary tumors and five relapsed tumors, respectively. In European Caucasian ETs, the median number of changes were 2.5 and 5.0 in 52 primary and 10 relapsed tumors, respectively. Frequent gains were 8q (38%), 8p (31%) and 12q (25%) in Japanese ETs and 8q (52%), 8p (48%) and 12q (19%) in European Caucasian ETs. Frequent losses were l9q (44%), 19p (38%) and 17p (25%) in Japanese ETs and 16q (21%), 19q (18%) and 17p (15%) in European Caucasian ETs. The incidence of losses of 19p (P = 0.0215) and 19q (P = 0.0277) were significantly higher in Japanese ETs than in European Caucasian ETs. An amplification (1p33-p34) was observed in only one Japanese ET. Conclusions: Japanese patients with ET in this study had a worse prognosis than European Caucasian patients. In molecular genetic analyses, Japanese ETs had a higher frequency of loss of chromosome 19 than European Caucasian ETs. Different genetic aberrations may explain the different incidences and prognoses of ET between Caucasian and Japanese patients.

KW - c-erbB-2

KW - Caucasian

KW - Chromosomal aberrations

KW - Comparative genomic hybridization

KW - Ewing's tumor prognosis

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