Plant hydraulic conductance measured by the high pressure flow meter in crop plants

Makoto Tsuda, Melvin T. Tyree

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

143 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A new high pressure flow meter (HPFM) method for measuring plant hydraulic conductances (K) was investigated to examine whether its results are comparable to those from a conventional evaporative flux (EF) method in crops. Hydraulic conductance (K) was measured by the two methods under quasi-steady-state conditions in six crops grown in pots: soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv. Tsurunoko daizu), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv. Russian mammoth), kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Tsurunashi morocco), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Sekai-ichi), green pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. shishitou), and eggplant (Solanum melongena L. cv. Seiguro chunaga nasu). There was a 1:1 agreement between K values measured by the two methods for K values of whole plant, root and stem, and leaf under quasi-steady-state conditions. Leaf water potential (Ψ(leaf)) and evaporative flux density (E) in sunflower was curvilinear, indicating whole plant K estimated by the EF method increased with increase of E. Predicted (Ψ(leaf)) (=E divided by whole plant K measured by the HPFM method) agreed with measured Ψ(leaf). Diurnal changes were also found in K measured by the HPFM confirming that K changed in response to temperature and E. The HPFM revealed that variable conductance was located in all organs: roots, stems, petioles, and leaves. These observations indicated that the HPFM is valid for crops as well as for trees (as previously established by Tsuda and Tyree) and has advantages over the EF method because of the speed and ease of the HPFM method.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)823-828
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Experimental Botany
Volume51
Issue number345
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2000

Fingerprint

flowmeters
fluid mechanics
Pressure
crops
Helianthus
Solanum melongena
Helianthus annuus
Capsicum
Phaseolus
leaves
Lycopersicon esculentum
methodology
Soybeans
Plant Stems
Morocco
kidney beans
Plant Roots
stems
Plant Leaves
eggplants

Keywords

  • Evaporative flux method
  • High pressure flow meter method
  • Hydraulic conductance
  • Root
  • Shoot
  • Variable conductance
  • Water potential

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Cite this

Plant hydraulic conductance measured by the high pressure flow meter in crop plants. / Tsuda, Makoto; Tyree, Melvin T.

In: Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol. 51, No. 345, 04.2000, p. 823-828.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tsuda, Makoto ; Tyree, Melvin T. / Plant hydraulic conductance measured by the high pressure flow meter in crop plants. In: Journal of Experimental Botany. 2000 ; Vol. 51, No. 345. pp. 823-828.
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