Pituitary apoplexy precipitating diabetes insipidus after living donor liver transplantation

Takashi Matsusaki, Hiroshi Morimatsu, Junya Matsumi, Hiroaki Matsuda, Tetsufumi Sato, Kenji Sato, Satoshi Mizobuchi, Takahito Yagi, Kiyoshi Morita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pituitary apoplexy occurring after surgery is a rare but life-threatening acute clinical condition that follows extensive hemorrhagenous necrosis within a pituitary adenoma. Pituitary apoplexy has been reported to occur spontaneously in the majority of cases or in association with various inducing factors. Reported is a case of pituitary apoplexy complicated by diabetes insipidus following living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). To the best of our knowledge, this has not been previously reported. A 56-year-old woman with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis underwent LDLT from her daughter. The patient also required dopamine support and transfusions because of massive intraoperative bleeding. Postoperatively, her coagulopathy continued, and she underwent a second laparotomy because of unknown bleeding on postoperative day 7, when she needed transfusions and dopamine support to maintain her vital signs. She complained of severe headache, excessive thirst, frequent urination, and diplopia from postoperative day 10. She also had polyuria greater than 300 ml/h and was diagnosed with pituitary apoplexy precipitating diabetes insipidus on postoperative day 13. She was treated conservatively without surgery because of the hormonally inactive status and slight mass effect of her tumor. It is important for anesthesiologists and critical care personnel in LDLT settings to take into consideration this complication as a differential diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)108-111
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Anesthesia
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2011

Keywords

  • Diabetes insipidus
  • Living donor liver transplantation
  • Pituitary apoplexy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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