Phylogeography of the East Asian grassland plant, Viola orientalis (Violaceae), inferred from plastid and nuclear restriction site-associated DNA sequencing data

Haruna Sata, Midori Shimizu, Takaya Iwasaki, Hajime Ikeda, Akiko Soejima, Andrey E. Kozhevnikov, Zoya V. Kozhevnikova, Hyoung Tak Im, Su Kil Jang, Takayuki Azuma, Atsushi J. Nagano, Noriyuki Fujii

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To elucidate the origin and migration history of the “Mansen elements,” a group of temperate grassland plants mainly distributed in northeastern Asia, phylogeographic analyses based on chloroplast DNA markers and double-digest restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (ddRAD-seq) data were performed on Viola orientalis, one of the representative species of the group. Phylogenetic analyses using ddRAD-seq data revealed that the populations of V. orientalis were clustered into five clades, among which the continental clades made of populations from Russia and Korea diverged more than 100,000 years earlier than the Japanese clades. The Japanese clade likely diverged during the last glacial period, followed by a further post-glacial divergence into the Kyushu and the Honshu subclades. Our study demonstrated that V. orientalis originated in the continental area of northeastern Asia and, during the last glacial period, has spread southward through the Korean Peninsula across the Japanese Islands. This finding supports the previously proposed evolutionary hypothesis regarding the origin and migration routes of the Mansen elements.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1181-1198
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Plant Research
Volume134
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2021

Keywords

  • DdRAD-seq
  • Genetic structure
  • Grassland
  • Japanese flora
  • Migration history
  • Population genetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

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