Phosphorus Stress-Induced Differential Growth, and Phosphorus Acquisition and Use Efficiency by Spring Wheat Cultivars

M. S. Akhtar, Y. Oki, Yoshitaka Nakashima, T. Adachi, Makoto Nishigaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Phosphorus (P) is a finite, non-renewable, and natural resource and a vital major nutrient for plant metabolic and developmental processes. However, adverse soil biogeochemical characteristics of alkaline-calcareous soils (especially Aridisols) and highly weathered acid soils (i.e., Ultisols and Oxisols) render orthophosphate (Pi) as the least available major nutrient due to P complexation, sorption, and/or fixation. In such soil environments, plant bioavailable P is only a small fraction of total soil P, seriously limiting crop growth and production. Different plant species, and even cultivars of the same species, may display a suite of growth responses that enable them to solubilize and scavenge soil P either by enhancing external Pi acquisition or reprioritizing internal Pi use under P-stress soil environments. This paper reports relative growth responses, P acquisition and P-use efficiency characteristics by 14 cultivars of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in solution culture with high/low P supply induced by applying soluble NH4H2PO4, sparingly soluble rock phosphate, and Ca3(PO4)2. The wheat cultivars exhibited considerable genetic diversity in biomass accumulation, P concentrations, P contents, factor (PSF) and P efficiency characteristics [i.e., P utilization efficiency (PUE), P efficiency (PE), and PE ratio (PER)]. Plant growth and PE parameters were significantly correlated, while P uptake was linearly related with biomass increase and solution pH decrease. The wheat cultivars with high PUE, PER and P uptake, and low PSF, and plant P concentration were more efficient in utilizing P and, hence, more tolerant under P-stress environment. Biomass and P contents of “P efficient/low-P tolerant” wheat cultivars were superior to “P inefficient/low-P sensitive” cultivars at all P-stress levels. Hence, “P efficient/low-P tolerant” cultivars are the most desirable wheat genotypes for P-stress environments because they are able to scavenge more P from sparingly soluble P sources or soil-bound P forms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15-27
Number of pages13
JournalCommunications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis
Volume47
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 30 2016

Fingerprint

spring wheat
cultivar
wheat
phosphorus
cultivars
soil
edaphic factors
growth response
biomass
Aridisols
nonrenewable resources
uptake mechanisms
nonrenewable resource
Ultisol
alkaline soils
phosphate rock
Ultisols
Oxisol
nutrient
rock phosphate

Keywords

  • P efficiency
  • rock phosphate
  • tricalcium phosphate
  • wheat cultivars

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Soil Science

Cite this

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title = "Phosphorus Stress-Induced Differential Growth, and Phosphorus Acquisition and Use Efficiency by Spring Wheat Cultivars",
abstract = "Phosphorus (P) is a finite, non-renewable, and natural resource and a vital major nutrient for plant metabolic and developmental processes. However, adverse soil biogeochemical characteristics of alkaline-calcareous soils (especially Aridisols) and highly weathered acid soils (i.e., Ultisols and Oxisols) render orthophosphate (Pi) as the least available major nutrient due to P complexation, sorption, and/or fixation. In such soil environments, plant bioavailable P is only a small fraction of total soil P, seriously limiting crop growth and production. Different plant species, and even cultivars of the same species, may display a suite of growth responses that enable them to solubilize and scavenge soil P either by enhancing external Pi acquisition or reprioritizing internal Pi use under P-stress soil environments. This paper reports relative growth responses, P acquisition and P-use efficiency characteristics by 14 cultivars of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in solution culture with high/low P supply induced by applying soluble NH4H2PO4, sparingly soluble rock phosphate, and Ca3(PO4)2. The wheat cultivars exhibited considerable genetic diversity in biomass accumulation, P concentrations, P contents, factor (PSF) and P efficiency characteristics [i.e., P utilization efficiency (PUE), P efficiency (PE), and PE ratio (PER)]. Plant growth and PE parameters were significantly correlated, while P uptake was linearly related with biomass increase and solution pH decrease. The wheat cultivars with high PUE, PER and P uptake, and low PSF, and plant P concentration were more efficient in utilizing P and, hence, more tolerant under P-stress environment. Biomass and P contents of “P efficient/low-P tolerant” wheat cultivars were superior to “P inefficient/low-P sensitive” cultivars at all P-stress levels. Hence, “P efficient/low-P tolerant” cultivars are the most desirable wheat genotypes for P-stress environments because they are able to scavenge more P from sparingly soluble P sources or soil-bound P forms.",
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T1 - Phosphorus Stress-Induced Differential Growth, and Phosphorus Acquisition and Use Efficiency by Spring Wheat Cultivars

AU - Akhtar, M. S.

AU - Oki, Y.

AU - Nakashima, Yoshitaka

AU - Adachi, T.

AU - Nishigaki, Makoto

PY - 2016/12/30

Y1 - 2016/12/30

N2 - Phosphorus (P) is a finite, non-renewable, and natural resource and a vital major nutrient for plant metabolic and developmental processes. However, adverse soil biogeochemical characteristics of alkaline-calcareous soils (especially Aridisols) and highly weathered acid soils (i.e., Ultisols and Oxisols) render orthophosphate (Pi) as the least available major nutrient due to P complexation, sorption, and/or fixation. In such soil environments, plant bioavailable P is only a small fraction of total soil P, seriously limiting crop growth and production. Different plant species, and even cultivars of the same species, may display a suite of growth responses that enable them to solubilize and scavenge soil P either by enhancing external Pi acquisition or reprioritizing internal Pi use under P-stress soil environments. This paper reports relative growth responses, P acquisition and P-use efficiency characteristics by 14 cultivars of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in solution culture with high/low P supply induced by applying soluble NH4H2PO4, sparingly soluble rock phosphate, and Ca3(PO4)2. The wheat cultivars exhibited considerable genetic diversity in biomass accumulation, P concentrations, P contents, factor (PSF) and P efficiency characteristics [i.e., P utilization efficiency (PUE), P efficiency (PE), and PE ratio (PER)]. Plant growth and PE parameters were significantly correlated, while P uptake was linearly related with biomass increase and solution pH decrease. The wheat cultivars with high PUE, PER and P uptake, and low PSF, and plant P concentration were more efficient in utilizing P and, hence, more tolerant under P-stress environment. Biomass and P contents of “P efficient/low-P tolerant” wheat cultivars were superior to “P inefficient/low-P sensitive” cultivars at all P-stress levels. Hence, “P efficient/low-P tolerant” cultivars are the most desirable wheat genotypes for P-stress environments because they are able to scavenge more P from sparingly soluble P sources or soil-bound P forms.

AB - Phosphorus (P) is a finite, non-renewable, and natural resource and a vital major nutrient for plant metabolic and developmental processes. However, adverse soil biogeochemical characteristics of alkaline-calcareous soils (especially Aridisols) and highly weathered acid soils (i.e., Ultisols and Oxisols) render orthophosphate (Pi) as the least available major nutrient due to P complexation, sorption, and/or fixation. In such soil environments, plant bioavailable P is only a small fraction of total soil P, seriously limiting crop growth and production. Different plant species, and even cultivars of the same species, may display a suite of growth responses that enable them to solubilize and scavenge soil P either by enhancing external Pi acquisition or reprioritizing internal Pi use under P-stress soil environments. This paper reports relative growth responses, P acquisition and P-use efficiency characteristics by 14 cultivars of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in solution culture with high/low P supply induced by applying soluble NH4H2PO4, sparingly soluble rock phosphate, and Ca3(PO4)2. The wheat cultivars exhibited considerable genetic diversity in biomass accumulation, P concentrations, P contents, factor (PSF) and P efficiency characteristics [i.e., P utilization efficiency (PUE), P efficiency (PE), and PE ratio (PER)]. Plant growth and PE parameters were significantly correlated, while P uptake was linearly related with biomass increase and solution pH decrease. The wheat cultivars with high PUE, PER and P uptake, and low PSF, and plant P concentration were more efficient in utilizing P and, hence, more tolerant under P-stress environment. Biomass and P contents of “P efficient/low-P tolerant” wheat cultivars were superior to “P inefficient/low-P sensitive” cultivars at all P-stress levels. Hence, “P efficient/low-P tolerant” cultivars are the most desirable wheat genotypes for P-stress environments because they are able to scavenge more P from sparingly soluble P sources or soil-bound P forms.

KW - P efficiency

KW - rock phosphate

KW - tricalcium phosphate

KW - wheat cultivars

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