Phosphorus release from cattle manure ash as soil amendment in laboratory-scale tests

Quoc Thinh Tran, Morihiro Maeda, Kazuyuki Oshita, Masaki Takaoka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Excessive application of animal manure to farmland leads to phosphorus (P) loss into the surrounding water. Manure is incinerated to convert it to P-rich ash as a slow-release P fertilizer. However, the potential P loss and P availability for plants from cattle manure ash (CMA) have not been fully understood. The aims of this study were to determine the P release mechanism from CMA and to propose appropriate application rates that mitigate P loss and increase available P to soil in Fukushima, where the soil is deficient in nutrients after the replacement of cesium-137-contaminated soil with sandy mountain soil. Different P fractions in CMA were sequentially extracted with H2O, 0.5 M NaHCO3, 0.1 M NaOH, and 1 M HCl. Phosphorus contents in different fractions of CMA were in the order of HCl–P > NaHCO3–P > H2O–P > NaOH–P. Water-soluble P release of CMA was also determined by kinetic experiments for 120 h. Results showed that total water-soluble P accounted for a maximum of 2.9% of total P in CMA over 120 h due to recalcitrant P compounds formed through incineration. The Fukushima sandy soil amended with CMA at three application rates, 94, 157, and 314 mg P kg−1 (corresponding to 300, 500, 1000 kg P2O5 ha−1) was incubated for 56 days. Cattle manure compost and KH2PO4 were applied at 157 mg P kg−1 for comparison. Phosphorus release in water and CaCl2 solution from ash-amended soil was significantly lower than those from compost and KH2PO4-amended soil at the same P application rate of 157 mg P kg−1 (p < 0.05). Available P in ash-amended soil, determined by Fe-oxide impregnated strips, was not significantly different from those in compost-amended soil after day 7 and KH2PO4-amended soil on day 56 at the same P application rate. Thus, CMA reduces P losses from soil to the surrounding water while it increases P availability for plants. In comparison of different rates of CMA, P release in water or CaCl2 was significantly greater at 314 mg P kg−1 than at 94 or 157 mg P kg−1, while the percentage of available P to total P was the lowest at the highest application rate (p < 0.05), suggesting that the best application rates were 94 and 157 mg P kg−1 in this experiment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalSoil Science and Plant Nutrition
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jul 27 2017

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soil amendment
soil amendments
cattle manure
cattle
manure
ash
phosphorus
application rate
testing
soil
compost
water
sandy soils
animal manures
composts
laboratory
test
mountain soils
composted manure
losses from soil

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Phosphorus release from cattle manure ash as soil amendment in laboratory-scale tests. / Tran, Quoc Thinh; Maeda, Morihiro; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Takaoka, Masaki.

In: Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, 27.07.2017, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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