Participation of chemical mediators other than histamine in nasal allergy signs: A study using mice lacking histamine H1 receptors

Ryoji Kayasuga, Yukio Sugimoto, Takeshi Watanabe, Chiaki Kamei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the involvement of chemical mediators other than histamine in nasal allergic signs using histamine H1 receptor-deficient mice. In passively sensitized mice, antigen instillation into the nasal cavity induced significant increases in sneezing and nasal rubbing in wild-type mice, but no such increases were observed in histamine H1 receptor-deficient mice. In actively sensitized mice, both sneezing and nasal rubbing were also significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner in both wild-type and histamine H1 receptor-deficient mice. Histamine H1 receptor antagonists such as cetirizine and epinastine significantly inhibited antigen-induced nasal allergic signs in wild-type mice, although the effects were incomplete. In addition, the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist ramatroban also inhibited these responses in wild-type mice. However, the leukotriene receptor antagonist zafirlukast showed no effects in wild-type mice. These results suggested that in the acute allergic model (passive sensitization), only histamine H1 receptors are related to nasal signs induced by antigen, whereas in the chronic allergic model (active sensitization), both histamine H1 receptors and thromboxane A2 receptors were involved in the responses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-291
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Pharmacology
Volume449
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 9 2002

Fingerprint

Histamine H1 Receptors
Nose
Histamine
Hypersensitivity
Prostaglandin H2 Receptors Thromboxane A2
Sneezing
Antigens
Cetirizine
Histamine H1 Antagonists
Leukotriene Antagonists
Nasal Cavity

Keywords

  • Leukotriene
  • Nasal allergic sign

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Participation of chemical mediators other than histamine in nasal allergy signs : A study using mice lacking histamine H1 receptors. / Kayasuga, Ryoji; Sugimoto, Yukio; Watanabe, Takeshi; Kamei, Chiaki.

In: European Journal of Pharmacology, Vol. 449, No. 3, 09.08.2002, p. 287-291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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