Parafunctional masseter muscle activity during waking is related to periodontitis progression: A pilot prospective cohort study

Daisuke Ekuni, Seiya Kato, Shigehisa Kawakami, Takayuki Maruyama, Kota Kataoka, Yoko Uchida-Fukuhara, Daiki Fukuhara, Naoki Toyama, Aya Yokoi, Md Monirul Islam, Subrina Binta Khair, Naoki Kodama, Manabu Morita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: The purpose of this pilot prospective cohort study was to investigate the effects of parafunctional masseter muscle activity on periodontitis progression among patients receiving supporting periodontal therapy (SPT). Materials and methods: We collected data of patients treated at Okayama University Hospital from August 2014 to September 2018. The progression group was defined as patients with ≥2 teeth demonstrating a longitudinal loss of proximal attachment of ≥3 mm during the 3-year study period and/or at least one tooth extraction due to periodontitis progression. Surface electromyography of masseter muscles at baseline was continuously recorded while patients were awake and asleep. Results: We analysed 48 patients (36 females) aged 66.8 ± 9.1 years (mean ± SD). The rate of parafunctional masseter muscle activity during waking hours and sleeping hours at baseline was 60.4% and 52.1%, respectively. Cox's proportional hazards regression model showed that the incidence of periodontitis progression was significantly associated with number of teeth present (p = 0.001) and parafunctional masseter muscle activity during waking hours (p = 0.041). Conclusion: Our results suggest that parafunctional masseter muscle activity during waking hours is a risk factor for periodontitis progression among patients receiving SPT.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Clinical Periodontology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • cohort studies
  • disease progression
  • masseter muscle
  • periodontitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Periodontics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Parafunctional masseter muscle activity during waking is related to periodontitis progression: A pilot prospective cohort study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this