Pace-of-life: Relationships among locomotor activity, life history, and circadian rhythm in the assassin bug, Amphibolus venator

Kentarou Matsumura, Ryohei Ito, Takahisa Miyatake

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis means that animal behavior is correlated with life history strategies. Studies have reported that the free-running period of the circadian rhythm (length of the period) is correlated with life history strategies in some animals. Although the length of the circadian rhythm may be associated with the POLS hypothesis, few studies have investigated the relationships among animal behavior, life history traits, and circadian rhythm. We tested the POLS hypothesis in the assassin bug, Amphibolus venator, which shows individual variation in locomotor activity. We found higher repeatability of differences in locomotor activity between individuals. Moreover, we found a trade-off between locomotor activity and developmental period such that active individuals developed faster. However, locomotor activity was not correlated with the length of the circadian rhythm in A. venator. Therefore, this study suggests that the length of the circadian rhythm in A. venator does not support the POLS hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-132
Number of pages6
JournalEthology
Volume125
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2019

Keywords

  • Amphibolus venator
  • circadian rhythm
  • life history
  • locomotor activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

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