Ownership-dependent mating tactics of minor males of the beetle Librodor japonicus (Nitidulidae) with intra-sexual dimorphism of mandibles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intra-sexual dimorphism is found in the weapons of many male beetles. Different behavioral tactics to access females between major and minor males, which adopt fighting and alternative tactics, respectively, are thought to maintain the male dimorphism. In these species major males have enlarged weapons that they use in fights with rival males. Minor males also have small weapons in some of these species, and it is unclear why these males possess weapons. We examined the hypothesis that minor males might adopt a fighting tactic when their status was relatively high in comparison with that of other males (e.g., ownership of a territory). We observed the behavioral tactics of major and minor males of the beetle Librodor japonicus, whose males have a dimorphism of their mandibles. Major males fought for resources, whereas minor males adopted two status-dependent tactics, fighting and sneaking, to access females, depending on their ownership of a sap site. We suggest that ownership status-dependent mating tactics in minor males may maintain the intra-sexual dimorphism in this beetle.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)255-261
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Ethology
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2007

Fingerprint

Nitidulidae
Ownership
Beetles
sexual dimorphism
ownership
Mandible
Sex Characteristics
beetle
Coleoptera
Weapons
weapon
fighting
dimorphism
sap

Keywords

  • Allometry
  • Alternative phenotype
  • Exaggerated trait
  • Male competition
  • Status-dependent selection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

@article{20f942b9045e407f8fd85d39e2a4057f,
title = "Ownership-dependent mating tactics of minor males of the beetle Librodor japonicus (Nitidulidae) with intra-sexual dimorphism of mandibles",
abstract = "Intra-sexual dimorphism is found in the weapons of many male beetles. Different behavioral tactics to access females between major and minor males, which adopt fighting and alternative tactics, respectively, are thought to maintain the male dimorphism. In these species major males have enlarged weapons that they use in fights with rival males. Minor males also have small weapons in some of these species, and it is unclear why these males possess weapons. We examined the hypothesis that minor males might adopt a fighting tactic when their status was relatively high in comparison with that of other males (e.g., ownership of a territory). We observed the behavioral tactics of major and minor males of the beetle Librodor japonicus, whose males have a dimorphism of their mandibles. Major males fought for resources, whereas minor males adopted two status-dependent tactics, fighting and sneaking, to access females, depending on their ownership of a sap site. We suggest that ownership status-dependent mating tactics in minor males may maintain the intra-sexual dimorphism in this beetle.",
keywords = "Allometry, Alternative phenotype, Exaggerated trait, Male competition, Status-dependent selection",
author = "Kensuke Okada and Takahisa Miyatake",
year = "2007",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1007/s10164-006-0021-0",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "255--261",
journal = "Journal of Ethology",
issn = "0289-0771",
publisher = "Springer Japan",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ownership-dependent mating tactics of minor males of the beetle Librodor japonicus (Nitidulidae) with intra-sexual dimorphism of mandibles

AU - Okada, Kensuke

AU - Miyatake, Takahisa

PY - 2007/9

Y1 - 2007/9

N2 - Intra-sexual dimorphism is found in the weapons of many male beetles. Different behavioral tactics to access females between major and minor males, which adopt fighting and alternative tactics, respectively, are thought to maintain the male dimorphism. In these species major males have enlarged weapons that they use in fights with rival males. Minor males also have small weapons in some of these species, and it is unclear why these males possess weapons. We examined the hypothesis that minor males might adopt a fighting tactic when their status was relatively high in comparison with that of other males (e.g., ownership of a territory). We observed the behavioral tactics of major and minor males of the beetle Librodor japonicus, whose males have a dimorphism of their mandibles. Major males fought for resources, whereas minor males adopted two status-dependent tactics, fighting and sneaking, to access females, depending on their ownership of a sap site. We suggest that ownership status-dependent mating tactics in minor males may maintain the intra-sexual dimorphism in this beetle.

AB - Intra-sexual dimorphism is found in the weapons of many male beetles. Different behavioral tactics to access females between major and minor males, which adopt fighting and alternative tactics, respectively, are thought to maintain the male dimorphism. In these species major males have enlarged weapons that they use in fights with rival males. Minor males also have small weapons in some of these species, and it is unclear why these males possess weapons. We examined the hypothesis that minor males might adopt a fighting tactic when their status was relatively high in comparison with that of other males (e.g., ownership of a territory). We observed the behavioral tactics of major and minor males of the beetle Librodor japonicus, whose males have a dimorphism of their mandibles. Major males fought for resources, whereas minor males adopted two status-dependent tactics, fighting and sneaking, to access females, depending on their ownership of a sap site. We suggest that ownership status-dependent mating tactics in minor males may maintain the intra-sexual dimorphism in this beetle.

KW - Allometry

KW - Alternative phenotype

KW - Exaggerated trait

KW - Male competition

KW - Status-dependent selection

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34548189027&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34548189027&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10164-006-0021-0

DO - 10.1007/s10164-006-0021-0

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:34548189027

VL - 25

SP - 255

EP - 261

JO - Journal of Ethology

JF - Journal of Ethology

SN - 0289-0771

IS - 3

ER -