Overheated and melted intracranial pressure transducer as cause of thermal brain injury during magnetic resonance imaging

Case report

Reiichiro Tanaka, Tetsuya Yumoto, Naoki Shiba, Motohisa Okawa, Takao Yasuhara, Tomotsugu Ichikawa, Koji Tokunaga, Isao Date, Yoshihito Ujike

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging is used with increasing frequency to provide accurate clinical information in cases of acute brain injury, and it is important to ensure that intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring devices are both safe and accurate inside the MRI suite. A rare case of thermal brain injury during MRI associated with an overheated ICP transducer is reported. This 20-year-old man had sustained a severe contusion of the right temporal and parietal lobes during a motor vehicle accident. An MR-compatible ICP transducer was placed in the left frontal lobe. The patient was treated with therapeutic hypothermia, barbiturate therapy, partial right temporal lobectomy, and decompressive craniectomy. Immediately after MRI examination on hospital Day 6, the ICP monitor was found to have stopped working, and the transducer was subsequently removed. The patient developed meningitis after this event, and repeat MRI revealed additional brain injury deep in the white matter on the left side, at the location of the ICP transducer. It is suspected that this new injury was caused by heating due to the radiofrequency radiation used in MRI because it was ascertained that the tip of the transducer had been melted and scorched. Scanning conditions - including configuration of the transducer, MRI parameters such as the type of radiofrequency coil, and the specific absorption rate limit - deviated from the manufacturer's recommendations. In cooperation with the manufacturer, the authors developed a precautionary tag describing guidelines for safe MR scanning to attach to the display unit of the product. Strict adherence to the manufacturer's guidelines is very important for preventing serious complications in patients with ICP monitors undergoing MRI examinations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1100-1109
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume117
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

Pressure Transducers
Intracranial Pressure
Brain Injuries
Hot Temperature
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Transducers
Decompressive Craniectomy
Guidelines
Induced Hypothermia
Parietal Lobe
Contusions
Frontal Lobe
Motor Vehicles
Temporal Lobe
Meningitis
Heating
Accidents
Radiation
Equipment and Supplies
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Antenna effect
  • Electromagnetic induction heating
  • Intracranial pressure monitor
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Meningitis
  • Thermal brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Overheated and melted intracranial pressure transducer as cause of thermal brain injury during magnetic resonance imaging : Case report. / Tanaka, Reiichiro; Yumoto, Tetsuya; Shiba, Naoki; Okawa, Motohisa; Yasuhara, Takao; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Tokunaga, Koji; Date, Isao; Ujike, Yoshihito.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 117, No. 6, 12.2012, p. 1100-1109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tanaka, Reiichiro ; Yumoto, Tetsuya ; Shiba, Naoki ; Okawa, Motohisa ; Yasuhara, Takao ; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu ; Tokunaga, Koji ; Date, Isao ; Ujike, Yoshihito. / Overheated and melted intracranial pressure transducer as cause of thermal brain injury during magnetic resonance imaging : Case report. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 2012 ; Vol. 117, No. 6. pp. 1100-1109.
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