Optimal scroll method for eye-gaze input system comparison of R-E and R-S compatibility

Atsuo Murata, Makoto Moriwaka, Yusuke Takagishi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

It is not clear which of the R-E and the S-R compatibility principles is proper for the eye-gaze input. This issue should be addressed for the development of more usable eye-gaze input system. The aim of this study was to explore which of the two compatibility principles was proper for the eye-gaze input system. For all scroll methods, the task completion time did not differ between R-E and S-R compatibility conditions (see Fig. 4). In other words, the speed of scroll did not differ between two compatibility conditions for all of three scroll methods. The number of errors per 90 trials significantly differed among scroll conditions and between R-E and S-R compatibility conditions. Judging from the accuracy of scroll, the error was less when the S-R compatibility like non-touch screen Microsoft Windows was applied than when the R-E compatibility like iPod or iPad was applied. In the range of this study, it seems that the S-R compatibility is dominant from the viewpoints of scroll accuracy for all of three scroll methods. The subjective rating on both usability and fatigue also supported the superiority of S-R compatibility over the R-E compatibility condition. In conclusion, the S-R compatibility was found to be superior for the eye-gaze input system.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages86-93
Number of pages8
Volume9170
ISBN (Print)9783319209159
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Event17th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI International 2015 - Los Angeles, United States
Duration: Aug 2 2015Aug 7 2015

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume9170
ISSN (Print)03029743
ISSN (Electronic)16113349

Other

Other17th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI International 2015
CountryUnited States
CityLos Angeles
Period8/2/158/7/15

Fingerprint

Compatibility
Window screens
Compatibility Conditions
Fatigue of materials
Completion Time
Fatigue
Usability
Range of data

Keywords

  • Auto scroll
  • Eye-gaze input
  • R-E compatibility
  • S-R compatibility
  • Scroll
  • Scroll icon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

Murata, A., Moriwaka, M., & Takagishi, Y. (2015). Optimal scroll method for eye-gaze input system comparison of R-E and R-S compatibility. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) (Vol. 9170, pp. 86-93). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 9170). Springer Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-20916-6_9

Optimal scroll method for eye-gaze input system comparison of R-E and R-S compatibility. / Murata, Atsuo; Moriwaka, Makoto; Takagishi, Yusuke.

Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 9170 Springer Verlag, 2015. p. 86-93 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 9170).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Murata, A, Moriwaka, M & Takagishi, Y 2015, Optimal scroll method for eye-gaze input system comparison of R-E and R-S compatibility. in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). vol. 9170, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 9170, Springer Verlag, pp. 86-93, 17th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI International 2015, Los Angeles, United States, 8/2/15. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-20916-6_9
Murata A, Moriwaka M, Takagishi Y. Optimal scroll method for eye-gaze input system comparison of R-E and R-S compatibility. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 9170. Springer Verlag. 2015. p. 86-93. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-20916-6_9
Murata, Atsuo ; Moriwaka, Makoto ; Takagishi, Yusuke. / Optimal scroll method for eye-gaze input system comparison of R-E and R-S compatibility. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 9170 Springer Verlag, 2015. pp. 86-93 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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