Optic lobe circadian pacemaker sends its information to the contralateral optic lobe in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus

K. Tomioka, M. Nakamichi, M. Yukizane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The bilaterally paired optic lobe pacemakers of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus are mutually coupled. In the present study we recorded the neural activity conveyed from the brain toward the optic lobe with a suction electrode to examine the coupling signals. The results demonstrated that the brain efferents to the optic lobe encode the circadian information: Both in constant light (LL) and constant darkness (DD), the neural activity of brain efferents showed a clear circadian rhythm with a nocturnal peak. Since the rhythm survived the severance of the contralateral optic nerve but disappeared when the contralateral optic lobe was removed, it is apparent that the rhythm originates from the contralateral optic lobe. The amplitude of the rhythm was greater in LL than in DD, suggesting that light affects the amplitude of the rhythm. This was confirmed by the fact that the light-induced response was under circadian control, being greater during the subjective night. These data suggest that the bilaterally paired optic lobe pacemakers exchange circadian information as well as light information. The data are also consistent with the results of previous behavioral experiment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)381-388
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Comparative Physiology A
Volume175
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Circadian rhythm
  • Cricket
  • Neural activity
  • Optic lobe
  • Pacemaker coupling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Physiology
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Optic lobe circadian pacemaker sends its information to the contralateral optic lobe in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this