Novel magnetic resonance imaging evaluation for valgus instability of the knee caused by medial collateral ligament injury

Hisanori Ikuma, Nobuhiro Abe, Youichiro Uchida, Takayuki Furumatsu, Kazuo Fujiwara, Keiichiro Nishida, Toshihumi Ozaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Instability of the knee after the medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury is usually assessed with the manual valgus stress test, even though, in recent years, it has become possible to apply magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the assessment of the damage of the ligament. The valgus instability of 24 patients (12 isolated injuries and 12 multiple ligament injuries) who suffered MCL injury between 1993 and 1998 was evaluated with the Hughston and Eilers classification, which involves radiographic assessment under manual valgus stress to the injured knees. We developed a novel system for classifying the degree of injury to the MCL by calculating the percentage of injured area based on MRI and investigated the relationship between this novel MRI classification and the magnitude of valgus instability by the Hughston and Eilers classification. There was a significant correlation between the 2 classifications (p = 0.0006). On the other hand, the results using other MRI based classification systems, such as the Mink and Deutsch classificaiton and the Petermann classification, were not correlated with the findings by the Hughston and Eilers classification in these cases (p <0.05). Since MRI is capable of assessing the injured ligament in clinical practice, this novel classification system would be useful for evaluating the stability of the knee and choosing an appropriate treatment following MCL injury. Copyright

Original languageEnglish
Article number6
JournalActa Medica Okayama
Volume62
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2008

Fingerprint

Knee Medial Collateral Ligament
Ligaments
Magnetic resonance
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Imaging techniques
Wounds and Injuries
Collateral Ligaments
Knee
Mink
Multiple Trauma
Exercise Test

Keywords

  • Knee instability
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Medial collateral ligament
  • Novel method

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Novel magnetic resonance imaging evaluation for valgus instability of the knee caused by medial collateral ligament injury. / Ikuma, Hisanori; Abe, Nobuhiro; Uchida, Youichiro; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Nishida, Keiichiro; Ozaki, Toshihumi.

In: Acta Medica Okayama, Vol. 62, No. 3, 6, 06.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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