Notch-induced rat and human bone marrow stromal cell grafts reduce ischemic cell loss and ameliorate behavioral deficits in chronic stroke animals

Takao Yasuhara, Noriyuki Matsukawa, Koichi Hara, Mina Maki, Mohammed M. Ali, Seong Jin Yu, Eunkyung Bae, Guolong Yu, Lin Xu, Michael McGrogan, Krys Bankiewicz, Casey Case, Cesar V. Borlongan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Gene transfection with Notch 1 intracellular domain and subsequent growth factor treatment stimulate neuron-like differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Here, we examined the potential of transplanting Notch-induced BMSCs to exert therapeutic effects in a rat model of chronic ischemic stroke. In experiment 1, Notch-induced rat BMSCs were intrastriatally transplanted in rats at 1 month after being subjected to transient occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCAo). Compared to post-stroke/pretransplantation level, significant improvements in locomotor and neurological function were detected in stroke rats that received 100 k and 200 k BMSCs, but not in those that received 40 k BMSCs. Histological results revealed 9%-15% graft survival, which dose-dependently correlated with behavioral recovery. At 5 weeks post-transplantation, some grafted BMSCs were positive for the glial marker GFAP (about 5%), but only a few cells (2-5 cells per brain) were positive for the neuronal marker NeuN. However, at 12 weeks post-transplantation, where the number of GFAP-positive BMSCs was maintained (5%), there was a dramatic increase in NeuN-positive BMSCs (23%). In experiment 2, Notch-induced human BMSCs were intrastriatally transplanted in rats at 1 month following the same MCAo model. Improvements in both locomotor and neurological function were observed from day 7 to day 28 post-transplantation, with the high dose (180 k) displaying significantly better behavioral recovery than the low dose (90 k) or vehicle. There were no observable adverse behavioral effects during this study period that also involved chronic immunosuppression of all animals. Histological analyses revealed a modest 5%-7% graft survival, with few (

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1501-1513
Number of pages13
JournalStem Cells and Development
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Stroke
Transplants
Transplantation
Graft Survival
Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction
Therapeutic Uses
Neuroglia
Immunosuppression
Transfection
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Neurons
Brain
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Hematology

Cite this

Notch-induced rat and human bone marrow stromal cell grafts reduce ischemic cell loss and ameliorate behavioral deficits in chronic stroke animals. / Yasuhara, Takao; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Hara, Koichi; Maki, Mina; Ali, Mohammed M.; Yu, Seong Jin; Bae, Eunkyung; Yu, Guolong; Xu, Lin; McGrogan, Michael; Bankiewicz, Krys; Case, Casey; Borlongan, Cesar V.

In: Stem Cells and Development, Vol. 18, No. 10, 01.12.2009, p. 1501-1513.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yasuhara, T, Matsukawa, N, Hara, K, Maki, M, Ali, MM, Yu, SJ, Bae, E, Yu, G, Xu, L, McGrogan, M, Bankiewicz, K, Case, C & Borlongan, CV 2009, 'Notch-induced rat and human bone marrow stromal cell grafts reduce ischemic cell loss and ameliorate behavioral deficits in chronic stroke animals', Stem Cells and Development, vol. 18, no. 10, pp. 1501-1513. https://doi.org/10.1089/scd.2009.0011
Yasuhara, Takao ; Matsukawa, Noriyuki ; Hara, Koichi ; Maki, Mina ; Ali, Mohammed M. ; Yu, Seong Jin ; Bae, Eunkyung ; Yu, Guolong ; Xu, Lin ; McGrogan, Michael ; Bankiewicz, Krys ; Case, Casey ; Borlongan, Cesar V. / Notch-induced rat and human bone marrow stromal cell grafts reduce ischemic cell loss and ameliorate behavioral deficits in chronic stroke animals. In: Stem Cells and Development. 2009 ; Vol. 18, No. 10. pp. 1501-1513.
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AU - Yasuhara, Takao

AU - Matsukawa, Noriyuki

AU - Hara, Koichi

AU - Maki, Mina

AU - Ali, Mohammed M.

AU - Yu, Seong Jin

AU - Bae, Eunkyung

AU - Yu, Guolong

AU - Xu, Lin

AU - McGrogan, Michael

AU - Bankiewicz, Krys

AU - Case, Casey

AU - Borlongan, Cesar V.

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