Nonaggressive interventions by third parties in conflicts among captive Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus)

Tomoyuki Tajima, Hidetoshi Kurotori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Whereas orangutans are regarded as semisolitary animals in the wild, several studies have reported frequent social interactions, including aggression, among orangutans in captivity. As yet, there is a lack of knowledge about how they cope with aggression. In this report, we provide a number of new observations of interventions by third parties in aggressive interactions within a captive group of Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) in the Tama Zoological Park, Japan. We observed that an adult female and a juvenile male orangutan intervened in aggressive interactions. The victim was a newly introduced juvenile female who was unrelated to anyone in the zoo. The ways in which the orangutans intervened were not aggressive, as the interveners simply aimed to separate the opponents, and these interventions did not lead to further aggression in almost every case. Our observations suggest that third parties can play an important role in managing aggressive conflicts among captive orangutans and, under conditions in which orangutans share limited space, nonaggressive interventions by third parties for settling conflicts appear. It is possible that orangutans may actively promote the peaceful coexistence of other individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)179-182
Number of pages4
JournalPrimates
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pongo pygmaeus
Pongo
Aggression
aggression
zoos
Wild Animals
Interpersonal Relations
Conflict (Psychology)
Japan
wild animals

Keywords

  • Captive group
  • Nonaggressive intervention
  • Pongo pygmaeus
  • Third-party intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Nonaggressive interventions by third parties in conflicts among captive Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus). / Tajima, Tomoyuki; Kurotori, Hidetoshi.

In: Primates, Vol. 51, No. 2, 2010, p. 179-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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