Non-myeloid cells are major contributors to innate immune responses via production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/CCL2

Teizo Yoshimura, Carole Galligan, Munehisa Takahashi, Keqiang Chen, Mingyong Liu, Lino Tessarollo, Ji Ming Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)/CCL2 is a chemokine regulating the recruitment of monocytes into sites of inflammation and cancer. MCP-1 can be produced by a variety of cell types, such as macrophages, neutrophils, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and epithelial cells. Notably, macrophages produce high levels of MCP-1 in response to proinflammatory stimuli in vitro, leading to the hypothesis that macrophages are the major source of MCP-1 during inflammatory responses in vivo. In stark contrast to the hypothesis, however, there was no significant reduction in MCP-1 protein or the number of infiltrating macrophages in the peritoneal inflammatory exudates of myeloid cell-specific MCP-1-deficient mice in response to i.p injection of thioglycollate or zymosan A. Furthermore, injection of LPS into skin air pouch also had no effect on local MCP-1 production in myeloid-specific MCP-1-deficient mice. Finally, myeloid-specific MCP-1-deficiency did not reduce MCP-1 mRNA expression or macrophage infiltration in LPS-induced lung injury. These results indicate that non-myeloid cells, in response to a variety of stimulants, play a previously unappreciated role in innate immune responses as the primary source of MCP-1.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberArticle 482
JournalFrontiers in Immunology
Volume4
Issue numberDEC
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chemokine CCL2
Innate Immunity
Macrophages
Thioglycolates
Protein Deficiency
Injections
Zymosan
Peritoneal Macrophages
Lung Injury
Exudates and Transudates
Myeloid Cells
Chemokines
Monocytes
Neutrophils
Endothelial Cells
Fibroblasts
Epithelial Cells
Air
Inflammation
Messenger RNA

Keywords

  • Chemokines
  • Gene knockout mice
  • Inflammation
  • Innate immunity
  • Myeloid cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Non-myeloid cells are major contributors to innate immune responses via production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/CCL2. / Yoshimura, Teizo; Galligan, Carole; Takahashi, Munehisa; Chen, Keqiang; Liu, Mingyong; Tessarollo, Lino; Wang, Ji Ming.

In: Frontiers in Immunology, Vol. 4, No. DEC, Article 482, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yoshimura, Teizo ; Galligan, Carole ; Takahashi, Munehisa ; Chen, Keqiang ; Liu, Mingyong ; Tessarollo, Lino ; Wang, Ji Ming. / Non-myeloid cells are major contributors to innate immune responses via production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/CCL2. In: Frontiers in Immunology. 2013 ; Vol. 4, No. DEC.
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