Nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions from two types of soil amended with manure compost at different ammonium nitrogen rates

Thanuja Deepani Panangala Liyanage, Morihiro Maeda, Hiroaki Somura, Makito Mori, Taku Fujiwara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N) content in soil is a key factor affecting nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions due to its role as a primary substrate of nitrification. This study aimed at investigating the effects of different application rates of NH4+-N on N2O and CO2 emissions from two different types of manure compost-amended soil, along with analysis of relative abundances of narG and nosZ genes under aerobic conditions. Laboratory experiments were conducted using Kochi and Ushimado soils amended with mixed compost (MC: mixture of cattle, poultry, and swine manure) or cattle manure compost (CC) at 3% (dry weight basis). In no compost- and compost-amended soils, (NH4)2SO4 was added as a solution equivalent to 160, 200, and 400 mg-N kg−1 of soil. Soil samples were aerobically incubated at 70% water-holding capacity (WHC) and 25°C. Emissions of N2O and CO2 were measured on days 0, 3, 7, 15, 21, 28, and 42. The abundances of narG and nosZ genes in Kochi (day 7) and Ushimado (day 21) soils were estimated using qPCR tests. Emissions of N2O and CO2 were higher in MC-amended soil because of higher mineral N content and lower C/N ratio of MC than those of CC, regardless of NH4+-N rates. Emissions of N2O and CO2 were higher in compost-amended Kochi soil due to higher mineral N, total N and C, and clay contents, and possibly because of higher water-filled pore spaces than those in Ushimado soil at the same WHC. In both soils with CC and no compost, raising NH4+-N rate from 160 to 200 increased N2O emissions due to stimulation of nitrification. In contrast, increasing NH4+-N rate from 200 to 400 decreased N2O and CO2 emissions except for N2O emissions in MC- and CO2 emissions in CC- and no compost-amended Ushimado soil possibly due to osmotic stress on microorganisms and limited C availability. Emissions of N2O were positively related to narG gene copy numbers in Kochi soil (R 2 =0.78) due to high N and C contents. Our study revealed that NH4+-N rate 400 suppresses N2O and CO2 emissions from manure compost-amended soil under aerobic conditions.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSoil Science and Plant Nutrition
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Carbon dioxide
  • compost
  • NH-N rate
  • nitrous oxide
  • osmotic stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Plant Science

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