Nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions from two soils amended with different manure composts in aerobic incubation tests

Thanuja Deepani Panangala Liyanage, Morihiro Maeda, Hiroaki Somura, Nguyen Thi Thu Thuong, Makito Mori, Taku Fujiwara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Identification of nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from soils amended with different types of compost is needed for appropriate use of manure in agriculture. This study aimed at investigating the interaction effects of compost type and soil properties and effects of moisture contents on N2O and CO2 emissions, with identification of relative abundances of functional ammonia-oxidizing genes. Laboratory tests were conducted using cattle manure compost (CC) or mixed compost (MC) (cattle, poultry, and swine manure) amended Kochi (from a greenhouse) or Ushimado (from a paddy field) soils (3% by weight) with controls (no compost). Initial moisture contents were adjusted to 60% water-holding capacity (WHC) for Kochi soil and 70% WHC for both soils. The samples were aerobically incubated at 25°C. Emissions of N2O and CO2 and contents of ammonium N (NH4+-N) and nitrate N in soils were measured continuously until day 42. The abundances of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea genes were estimated to evaluate nitrifying activities. Cumulative N2O and CO2 emissions were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in MC than those in CC treatments probably due to higher NH4+-N content and lower C/N ratio, which facilitated faster N mineralization and C decomposition. Emissions of N2O and CO2 were higher in compost-amended Kochi soil (70% WHC) with high total C and N, mineral N, and clay contents than those in less fertile Ushimado soil. Interestingly, interactions of compost type and soil properties on N2O emissions were significant (p < 0.05) only in Kochi soil because the addition of decomposition resistant CC increased N2O emissions only from this soil with high C and N contents. Higher soil moisture contents increased N2O and CO2 emissions significantly (p < 0.05) in Kochi soil. Emissions of N2O until day 15 were mainly due to activities of AOB amoA genes (R2 = 0.91). This study suggests that N2O emissions are increased by high NH4+-N contents and a low C/N ratio in compost and high total C and N, mineral N, and clay contents in soil. The application of compost with less decomposable C increases N2O emissions only from nutrient-rich soil.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSoil Science and Plant Nutrition
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Aerobic incubation
  • carbon dioxide
  • compost
  • nitrous oxide
  • WHC

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Plant Science

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