Neutrophil attractant/activation protein-1 (NAP-1 [interleukin-8]).

E. J. Leonard, Teizo Yoshimura

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

153 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neutrophil attractant/activation protein-1 (NAP-1 [interleukin-8]) is an 8,400 D protein that is a chemoattractant and granule release stimulus for neutrophils. NAP-1 was first purified from culture fluids of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human blood mononuclear leukocytes. It was subsequently isolated from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated lung macrophages, mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes, and virus-infected fibroblasts. Interleukin-1 or tumor necrosis factor induces NAP-1 mRNA in many cells, including monocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. NAP-1 belongs in a family of host defense small proteins, which have a degree of sequence and structural similarity. Noteworthy are the four half-cystine residues in each protein, which are in register when the protein sequences are suitably aligned. Based on cloning data and N-terminal sequence analyses, NAP-1 is secreted as a 79 residue protein after cleavage of a 20 residue signal peptide. The commonly isolated 77 and 72 residue forms are probably extracellular cleavage products. NAP-1 has considerable charge heterogeneity. Charge and length variants all have chemotactic activity. In contrast to many chemoattractants, NAP-1 does not attract monocytes. Intradermal injection of NAP-1 causes neutrophil infiltration. The wide spectrum of cell sources and production stimuli suggests that NAP-1 mediates neutrophil recruitment in host defense and disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)479-486
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology
Volume2
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Neutrophil Activation
Interleukin-8
Chemical activation
Proteins
Neutrophil Infiltration
Chemotactic Factors
Fibroblasts
Lipopolysaccharides
Monocytes
Mononuclear Leukocytes
1-nitro-2-acetylpyrrole
Intradermal Injections
Lymphocytes
Macrophages
Cloning
Endothelial cells
Protein Sorting Signals
Interleukin-1
Viruses
Mitogens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Neutrophil attractant/activation protein-1 (NAP-1 [interleukin-8]). / Leonard, E. J.; Yoshimura, Teizo.

In: American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, Vol. 2, No. 6, 06.1990, p. 479-486.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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