Neutralizing antibody responses to human herpesviruses 6 and 7 do not cross-react with each other, and maternal neutralizing antibodies contribute to sequential infection with these viruses in childhood

Mariko Yoshida, Sadayoshi Torigoe, Kumiko Ikeue, Masao Yamada

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Abstract

Seroprevalence of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and HHV-7 infections is very high throughout the world, and almost all people are exposed first to HHV-6 and second to HHV-7 in their childhood. However, it is not clear whether the neutralizing (NT) antibody response between each virus is cross-reactive or not. To elucidate the NT antibody response between each virus, 55 serum samples from an adult group (subjects 22 to 88 years old) and 60 serum samples from a young group (subjects 2 to 18 years old) were examined by a dot blot method for detecting viral late antigen. Thirty-nine serum samples obtained from cord bloods and a few serum samples obtained from pediatric patients with exanthem subitum were also examined to assess the maternal transferred NT antibodies against each virus. The NT antibody titers against HHV-7 in the adult group remained high throughout all the individuals, and none were negative. Those against HHV-6 were high values in the young group but low values, including negative values (three samples), in the adult group. These results suggested that the NT antibody response to either HHV-6 or HHV-7 in each individual was specific to each virus and did not cross-react with each other. In the adult group, the NT antibody response to HHV-6 decreased, while that to HHV-7 remained high throughout all the individuals. Maternal transferred NT antibody titers against HHV-7 were higher and remained longer after birth than those of HHV-6, and these findings were in accord with the clinical observation that HHV-6 infection usually occurs earlier than HHV-7 infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)388-393
Number of pages6
JournalClinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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Human Herpesvirus 7
Human Herpesvirus 6
Virus Diseases
Neutralizing Antibodies
Viruses
Antibody Formation
Mothers
Serum
Herpesviridae Infections
Pediatrics
Viral Antigens
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Infection
Exanthema
Fetal Blood
Blood
Parturition
Antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Immunology

Cite this

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title = "Neutralizing antibody responses to human herpesviruses 6 and 7 do not cross-react with each other, and maternal neutralizing antibodies contribute to sequential infection with these viruses in childhood",
abstract = "Seroprevalence of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and HHV-7 infections is very high throughout the world, and almost all people are exposed first to HHV-6 and second to HHV-7 in their childhood. However, it is not clear whether the neutralizing (NT) antibody response between each virus is cross-reactive or not. To elucidate the NT antibody response between each virus, 55 serum samples from an adult group (subjects 22 to 88 years old) and 60 serum samples from a young group (subjects 2 to 18 years old) were examined by a dot blot method for detecting viral late antigen. Thirty-nine serum samples obtained from cord bloods and a few serum samples obtained from pediatric patients with exanthem subitum were also examined to assess the maternal transferred NT antibodies against each virus. The NT antibody titers against HHV-7 in the adult group remained high throughout all the individuals, and none were negative. Those against HHV-6 were high values in the young group but low values, including negative values (three samples), in the adult group. These results suggested that the NT antibody response to either HHV-6 or HHV-7 in each individual was specific to each virus and did not cross-react with each other. In the adult group, the NT antibody response to HHV-6 decreased, while that to HHV-7 remained high throughout all the individuals. Maternal transferred NT antibody titers against HHV-7 were higher and remained longer after birth than those of HHV-6, and these findings were in accord with the clinical observation that HHV-6 infection usually occurs earlier than HHV-7 infection.",
author = "Mariko Yoshida and Sadayoshi Torigoe and Kumiko Ikeue and Masao Yamada",
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AU - Yamada, Masao

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