Neural transplantation normalizes dopaminergic dysfunction in an animal model of parkinson's disease

N. Ogawa, K. Mizukawa, H. Nishiono, M. Asanuma, M. Yamamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Levodopa (L-DOPA) is the most commonly used pharmacotherapy in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), but is also associated with adverse effects during chronic use and a decreased ability to control PD as the disease progresses. Neural transplantation of dopamine-synthesizing cells is being explored as a possible alternative to L-DOPA for the treatment of PD. In a rodent model of PD, we demonstrated that neural transplantation of dopamine-releasing cells (from fetal midbrain areas) led to normalisation of striatal D1 and D2 dopamine receptors to their non-PD levels at 3 months post-transplantation, which was accompanied by near normalization of rotational behavior. Immunohistochemical evaluation showed that grafted fetal dopaminergic cells survive, synthesize and release dopamine for at least 3 months post-transplantation. Grafting of neuronal cells into the brain therefore represents a promising approach to restoring disturbed motor function characteristic of PD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-138
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Brain Science
Volume25
Issue number3-4
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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