Neural transplantation normalizes dopaminergic dysfunction in an animal model of parkinson's disease

N. Ogawa, K. Mizukawa, H. Nishiono, Masato Asanuma, M. Yamamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Levodopa (L-DOPA) is the most commonly used pharmacotherapy in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), but is also associated with adverse effects during chronic use and a decreased ability to control PD as the disease progresses. Neural transplantation of dopamine-synthesizing cells is being explored as a possible alternative to L-DOPA for the treatment of PD. In a rodent model of PD, we demonstrated that neural transplantation of dopamine-releasing cells (from fetal midbrain areas) led to normalisation of striatal D1 and D2 dopamine receptors to their non-PD levels at 3 months post-transplantation, which was accompanied by near normalization of rotational behavior. Immunohistochemical evaluation showed that grafted fetal dopaminergic cells survive, synthesize and release dopamine for at least 3 months post-transplantation. Grafting of neuronal cells into the brain therefore represents a promising approach to restoring disturbed motor function characteristic of PD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-138
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Brain Science
Volume25
Issue number3-4
Publication statusPublished - 1999

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Parkinson Disease
Animal Models
Transplantation
Dopamine
Corpus Striatum
Dopamine D1 Receptors
Aptitude
Dopamine D2 Receptors
Levodopa
Mesencephalon
Rodentia
Drug Therapy
Brain
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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Neural transplantation normalizes dopaminergic dysfunction in an animal model of parkinson's disease. / Ogawa, N.; Mizukawa, K.; Nishiono, H.; Asanuma, Masato; Yamamoto, M.

In: Journal of Brain Science, Vol. 25, No. 3-4, 1999, p. 133-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ogawa, N, Mizukawa, K, Nishiono, H, Asanuma, M & Yamamoto, M 1999, 'Neural transplantation normalizes dopaminergic dysfunction in an animal model of parkinson's disease', Journal of Brain Science, vol. 25, no. 3-4, pp. 133-138.
Ogawa, N. ; Mizukawa, K. ; Nishiono, H. ; Asanuma, Masato ; Yamamoto, M. / Neural transplantation normalizes dopaminergic dysfunction in an animal model of parkinson's disease. In: Journal of Brain Science. 1999 ; Vol. 25, No. 3-4. pp. 133-138.
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