Nerve signaling regulates basal keratinocyte proliferation in the blastema apical epithelial cap in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum)

Akira Sato, Susan V. Bryant, David M. Gardiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability of adult vertebrates to repair tissue damage is widespread and impressive; however, the ability to regenerate structurally complex organs such as the limb is limited largely to the salamanders. The fact that most of the tissues of the limb can regenerate has led investigators to question and identify the barriers to organ regeneration. From studies in the salamander, it is known that one of the earliest steps required for successful regeneration involves signaling between nerves and the wound epithelium/apical epithelial cap (AEC). In this study we confirm an earlier report that the keratinocytes of the AEC acquire their function coincident with exiting the cell cycle. We have discovered that this unique, coordinated behavior is regulated by nerve signaling and is associated with the presence of gap junctions between the basal keratinocytes of the AEC. Disruption of nerve signaling results in a loss of gap junction protein, the reentry of the cells into the cell cycle, and regenerative failure. Finally, coordinated exit from the cell cycle appears to be a conserved behavior of populations of cells that function as signaling centers during both development and regeneration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)374-381
Number of pages8
JournalDevelopmental Biology
Volume366
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 15 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ambystoma mexicanum
Keratinocytes
Urodela
Regeneration
Cell Cycle
Aptitude
Extremities
Connexins
Gap Junctions
Vertebrates
Epithelium
Research Personnel
Wounds and Injuries
Population

Keywords

  • Apical epithelial cap
  • Axolotl
  • Gap junctions
  • Keratinocytes
  • Limb regeneration
  • Nerves

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Nerve signaling regulates basal keratinocyte proliferation in the blastema apical epithelial cap in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum). / Sato, Akira; Bryant, Susan V.; Gardiner, David M.

In: Developmental Biology, Vol. 366, No. 2, 15.06.2012, p. 374-381.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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