Morphological Changes and Durability of Skin and Mucosal Flaps in Intraoral and Pharyngeal Reconstructions: Long-term Follow-up and Literature Review for Potential Second Carcinomas

Hiroshi Matsumoto, Yoshihiro Kimata, Tomoyuki Ota, Narushi Sugiyama, Satoshi Onoda, Takuma Makino, Seiko Takeda, Nobuyoshi Mizukawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The long-term changes in tissues implanted in the oral cavity and pharynx after head and neck reconstruction have not been fully evaluated. This study aimed to clarify the morphological changes, long-term durability, and potential for secondary carcinogenesis in such tissues. In our single-center study, the rough morphological 54 cases of intraoral and pharyngeal skin and mucosal flaps were evaluated more than 10 years after addition, the literature on the development of second carcinomas from skin flaps was reviewed. The mean follow-up period for transferred flaps was 148 months. The reconstruction areas and the probability of morphological changes were significantly correlated (p=0.006), especially in cases with tongue, lower gingiva, reconstruction. Free jejunal flap surfaces were well maintained, whereas tubed skin series developed second primary carcinomas. Skin flaps generally had good durability for > 10 years in intraoral while mucosal flaps had better durability for pharyngeal reconstruction. Second squamous carcinomas arising from skin flaps are extremely rare; however, surgeons should take this possibility into consideration and long-term follow-up.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)725-734
Number of pages10
JournalActa medica Okayama
Volume75
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Morphological change
  • Mucosal flap
  • Oral reconstruction
  • Second primary carcinoma
  • Skin flap

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Morphological Changes and Durability of Skin and Mucosal Flaps in Intraoral and Pharyngeal Reconstructions: Long-term Follow-up and Literature Review for Potential Second Carcinomas'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this