Molecular and cytological analyses of large tracks of centromeric DNA reveal the structure and evolutionary dynamics of maize centromeres

Kiyotaka Nagaki, Junqi Song, Robert M. Stupar, Alexander S. Parokonny, Qiaoping Yuan, Shu Ouyang, Jia Liu, Joseph Hsiao, Kristine M. Jones, R. Kelly Dawe, C. Robin Buellt, Jiming Jiang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

134 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We sequenced two maize bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones anchored by the centromere-specific satellite repeat CentC. The two BACs, consisting of ∼200 kb of cytologically defined centromeric DNA, are composed exclusively of satellite sequences and retrotransposons that can be classified as centromere specific or noncentromere specific on the basis of their distribution in the maize genome. Sequence analysis suggests that the original maize sequences were composed of CentC arrays that were expanded by retrotransposon invasions. Seven centromere-specific retrotransposons of maize (CRM) were found in BAC 16H10. The CRM elements inserted randomly into either CentC monomers or other retrotransposons. Sequence comparisons of the long terminal repeats (LTRs) of individual CRM elements indicated that these elements transposed within the last 1.22 million years. We observed that all of the previously reported centromere-specific retrotransposons in rice and barley, which belong to the same family as the CRM elements, also recently transposed with the oldest element having transposed ∼3.8 million years ago. Highly conserved sequence motifs were found in the LTRs of the centromere-specific retrotransposons in the grass species, suggesting that the LTRs may be important for the centromere specificity of this retrotransposon family.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)759-770
Number of pages12
JournalGenetics
Volume163
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Retroelements
Centromere
Zea mays
DNA
Terminal Repeat Sequences
Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes
Conserved Sequence
Hordeum
Poaceae
Sequence Analysis
Clone Cells
Genome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Nagaki, K., Song, J., Stupar, R. M., Parokonny, A. S., Yuan, Q., Ouyang, S., ... Jiang, J. (2003). Molecular and cytological analyses of large tracks of centromeric DNA reveal the structure and evolutionary dynamics of maize centromeres. Genetics, 163(2), 759-770.

Molecular and cytological analyses of large tracks of centromeric DNA reveal the structure and evolutionary dynamics of maize centromeres. / Nagaki, Kiyotaka; Song, Junqi; Stupar, Robert M.; Parokonny, Alexander S.; Yuan, Qiaoping; Ouyang, Shu; Liu, Jia; Hsiao, Joseph; Jones, Kristine M.; Kelly Dawe, R.; Robin Buellt, C.; Jiang, Jiming.

In: Genetics, Vol. 163, No. 2, 01.02.2003, p. 759-770.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nagaki, K, Song, J, Stupar, RM, Parokonny, AS, Yuan, Q, Ouyang, S, Liu, J, Hsiao, J, Jones, KM, Kelly Dawe, R, Robin Buellt, C & Jiang, J 2003, 'Molecular and cytological analyses of large tracks of centromeric DNA reveal the structure and evolutionary dynamics of maize centromeres', Genetics, vol. 163, no. 2, pp. 759-770.
Nagaki, Kiyotaka ; Song, Junqi ; Stupar, Robert M. ; Parokonny, Alexander S. ; Yuan, Qiaoping ; Ouyang, Shu ; Liu, Jia ; Hsiao, Joseph ; Jones, Kristine M. ; Kelly Dawe, R. ; Robin Buellt, C. ; Jiang, Jiming. / Molecular and cytological analyses of large tracks of centromeric DNA reveal the structure and evolutionary dynamics of maize centromeres. In: Genetics. 2003 ; Vol. 163, No. 2. pp. 759-770.
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