Melting experiments on peridotite to lowermost mantle conditions

Shigehiko Tateno, Kei Hirose, Yasuo Ohishi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Melting experiments on a pyrolitic mantle material were performed in a pressure range from 34 to 179GPa based on laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (DAC) techniques. The textural and chemical characterizations of quenched samples were made by using field-emission-type electron microprobe (FE-EPMA). Melts formed by 46 to 77wt.% partial melting in this study were ultrabasic in composition and became more depleted in SiO2 and more enriched in FeO with increasing pressure. Melting textures indicate that the liquidus phase changed from ferropericlase to MgSiO3-rich perovskite at least above 34GPa and further to post-perovskite. The first phase to melt (disappear) changed from CaSiO3 perovskite to (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase between 68 and 82GPa. The stability of ferropericlase above solidus temperature shrinks with increasing pressure (melting last below 34GPa and first 82GPa), resulting in higher (MgO+FeO)/SiO2 ratio in partial melt at higher pressure. Additionally, the Fe-Mg distribution coefficients (KD) between perovskite/post-perovskite and melt decreased considerably with increasing pressure, leading to strong Fe-enrichment in partial melts. It supports dense partial melts in a deep lower mantle, which migrate downward to the core mantle boundary (CMB). Key Points Melting relations and chemical compositions of melt and solid to CMB conditions Partial melt become more ultrabasic with increasing pressure Strong Fe enrichment in partial melts formed at deep lower mantle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4684-4694
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research B: Solid Earth
Volume119
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

peridotite
Earth mantle
Melting
melting
melt
mantle
perovskite
core-mantle boundary
experiment
Experiments
lower mantle
solidus
liquidus
anvils
Diamond
Electron probe microanalysis
melting points
field emission
Chemical analysis
chemical composition

Keywords

  • diamond-anvil cell
  • lower mantle
  • melting
  • peridotite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Melting experiments on peridotite to lowermost mantle conditions. / Tateno, Shigehiko; Hirose, Kei; Ohishi, Yasuo.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research B: Solid Earth, Vol. 119, No. 6, 2014, p. 4684-4694.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tateno, Shigehiko ; Hirose, Kei ; Ohishi, Yasuo. / Melting experiments on peridotite to lowermost mantle conditions. In: Journal of Geophysical Research B: Solid Earth. 2014 ; Vol. 119, No. 6. pp. 4684-4694.
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