Mechanism of haemolysis by Vibrio vulnificus haemolysin.

H. Yamanaka, T. Satoh, T. Katsu, S. Shinoda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The haemolytic action of Vibrio vulnificus haemolysin (VVH) was compared to that of streptolysin O (SLO). Both were cholesterol-binding haemolysins, but differed in the release of haemoglobin (Hb). In the first step of haemolysis, the haemolysins were temperature-independently bound to the cholesterol site on the target erythrocyte membrane. This was followed by the rapid release of K+, which is an intra-erythrocyte marker. Hb was then released, in different ways. In the case of VVH, Hb was released slowly after a relatively long lag, whereas with SLO, Hb was released as rapidly as K+. Haemolysis by VVH was inhibited by the addition of 30 mM-dextran 4 (mean Mr 4000), which is considered to be an effective colloid-osmotic protectant. The results therefore indicated that haemolysis by VVH (like that by Escherichia coli alpha-haemolysin and Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin) was caused by a colloid-osmotic mechanism. Both K+ and Hb release caused by VVH proceeded temperature-dependently, and the membrane fluidity of liposomes prepared with lipids extracted from sheep red blood cell membranes increased above 20 degrees C. These results suggest that the temperature-dependence of the haemolysis by VVH is due to the requirement for an increase in the membrane fluidity during the formation of a transmembrane pore.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of General Microbiology
Volume133
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1987

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Vibrio vulnificus
Hemolysis
Hemoglobins
Hemolysin Proteins
Membrane Fluidity
Colloids
Temperature
Erythrocytes
Cholesterol
Erythrocyte Membrane
Dextrans
Liposomes
Vibrio hemolysin
Sheep
Cell Membrane
Lipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology

Cite this

Yamanaka, H., Satoh, T., Katsu, T., & Shinoda, S. (1987). Mechanism of haemolysis by Vibrio vulnificus haemolysin. Journal of General Microbiology, 133.

Mechanism of haemolysis by Vibrio vulnificus haemolysin. / Yamanaka, H.; Satoh, T.; Katsu, T.; Shinoda, S.

In: Journal of General Microbiology, Vol. 133, 10.1987.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yamanaka, H, Satoh, T, Katsu, T & Shinoda, S 1987, 'Mechanism of haemolysis by Vibrio vulnificus haemolysin.', Journal of General Microbiology, vol. 133.
Yamanaka, H. ; Satoh, T. ; Katsu, T. ; Shinoda, S. / Mechanism of haemolysis by Vibrio vulnificus haemolysin. In: Journal of General Microbiology. 1987 ; Vol. 133.
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