Maxillofacial fractures sustained during sports played with a ball

Cagri Delilbasi, Michikuni Yamazawa, Kimiko Nomura, Seiji Iida, Mikihiko Kogo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and type of maxillofacial fractures caused by various sports played with a ball to better understand the nature of these fractures. Study design. Retrospective study was carried out using records from 100 patients treated between 1986-2002. Age and sex, etiology, and site of the fracture, yearly and monthly distribution of the fractures, and treatment modality were analyzed. Results. The fractures mostly resulted from baseball (44%), followed by rugby (28%) and soccer (18%). The highest incidence was in the 10- to 19-year age-group with male propensity. The most common cause of the fractures was impact against another player (43%). The majority of the patients suffered from mandibular fractures (56%), followed by midface (31%) and alveolar fractures (12%). Mandibular angle, zygoma, and zygomatic arch fractures were prominent for rugby fractures. A yearly comparison of the fracture incidence showed a gradual decrease over the 16-year period. Fractures had a peak incidence in autumn. 55% of the patients were treated surgically. Surgical intervention was mostly needed for patients sustaining fractures during soccer (72.2%). Conclusions. Among ball-related sports, baseball is responsible for most of the maxillofacial fractures, but, although the incidence is not that high, soccer-related fractures may be more severe due to the nature of this sport.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-27
Number of pages5
JournalOral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics
Volume97
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Sports
Soccer
Incidence
Zygoma
Baseball
Football
Zygomatic Fractures
Mandibular Fractures
Retrospective Studies
Age Groups
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Surgery

Cite this

Maxillofacial fractures sustained during sports played with a ball. / Delilbasi, Cagri; Yamazawa, Michikuni; Nomura, Kimiko; Iida, Seiji; Kogo, Mikihiko.

In: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics, Vol. 97, No. 1, 01.2004, p. 23-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Delilbasi, Cagri ; Yamazawa, Michikuni ; Nomura, Kimiko ; Iida, Seiji ; Kogo, Mikihiko. / Maxillofacial fractures sustained during sports played with a ball. In: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics. 2004 ; Vol. 97, No. 1. pp. 23-27.
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