Maternal body mass index is a better indicator of large-for-gestational-age infants compared with a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test in early pregnancy: The JAGS trial

The JAGS Group

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims There is no previous study comparing the predictive ability of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) versus a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in early pregnancy for large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants. Methods This multi-institutional prospective cohort study included 966 pregnant Japanese women. A multiple logistic regression model was applied to compare the effect size of pre-pregnancy BMI, fasting plasma glucose (PG), and 1- and 2-h PG levels after a 75-g OGTT performed before 22 weeks gestation for LGA. After these variables were included separately into the model as per continuous variables 1 standard deviation (SD) increase, they were included simultaneously. Results When pre-pregnancy BMI, fasting PG, and 1- and 2-h PG after a 75-g OGTT were separately included in the model, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for LGA per 1 SD increase in pre-pregnancy BMI, fasting, and 1- and 2-h PG were 1.55 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.26–1.91), 1.26 (95% CI: 1.03–1.54), 0.99 (95% CI: 0.78–1.25), and 1.17 (95% CI: 0.93–1.49), respectively. When these variables were included simultaneously, the adjusted ORs per 1 SD increase in pre-pregnancy BMI, fasting, and 1- and 2-h PG were 1.52 (95% CI: 1.23–1.88), 1.19 (95% CI: 0.96–1.46), 0.77 (95% CI: 0.57–1.03), and 1.30 (95% CI: 0.96–1.76), respectively. Conclusions Maternal pre-pregnancy BMI was more strongly associated with LGA compared with a 75-g OGTT in early pregnancy. Health-care providers should recognize that women with a higher pre-pregnancy BMI carry a higher risk for having LGA infants regardless of the results of a 75-g OGTT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10-18
Number of pages9
JournalDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Volume132
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2017

Fingerprint

Glucose Tolerance Test
Gestational Age
Body Mass Index
Mothers
Pregnancy
Confidence Intervals
Glucose
Fasting
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Aptitude
Health Personnel
Pregnant Women
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • 75-g oral glucose tolerance test
  • Body mass index
  • Large-for-gestational age
  • Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

@article{37c01c1be0b146c39d47d9434e8852ca,
title = "Maternal body mass index is a better indicator of large-for-gestational-age infants compared with a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test in early pregnancy: The JAGS trial",
abstract = "Aims There is no previous study comparing the predictive ability of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) versus a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in early pregnancy for large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants. Methods This multi-institutional prospective cohort study included 966 pregnant Japanese women. A multiple logistic regression model was applied to compare the effect size of pre-pregnancy BMI, fasting plasma glucose (PG), and 1- and 2-h PG levels after a 75-g OGTT performed before 22 weeks gestation for LGA. After these variables were included separately into the model as per continuous variables 1 standard deviation (SD) increase, they were included simultaneously. Results When pre-pregnancy BMI, fasting PG, and 1- and 2-h PG after a 75-g OGTT were separately included in the model, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for LGA per 1 SD increase in pre-pregnancy BMI, fasting, and 1- and 2-h PG were 1.55 (95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 1.26–1.91), 1.26 (95{\%} CI: 1.03–1.54), 0.99 (95{\%} CI: 0.78–1.25), and 1.17 (95{\%} CI: 0.93–1.49), respectively. When these variables were included simultaneously, the adjusted ORs per 1 SD increase in pre-pregnancy BMI, fasting, and 1- and 2-h PG were 1.52 (95{\%} CI: 1.23–1.88), 1.19 (95{\%} CI: 0.96–1.46), 0.77 (95{\%} CI: 0.57–1.03), and 1.30 (95{\%} CI: 0.96–1.76), respectively. Conclusions Maternal pre-pregnancy BMI was more strongly associated with LGA compared with a 75-g OGTT in early pregnancy. Health-care providers should recognize that women with a higher pre-pregnancy BMI carry a higher risk for having LGA infants regardless of the results of a 75-g OGTT.",
keywords = "75-g oral glucose tolerance test, Body mass index, Large-for-gestational age, Pregnancy",
author = "{The JAGS Group} and Noriyuki Iwama and Takashi Sugiyama and Hirohito Metoki and Hideto Kusaka and Jota Maki and Hidekazu Nishigori and Nobuo Yaegashi and Norimasa Sagawa and Yuji Hiramatsu and Nagayasu Toyoda",
year = "2017",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.diabres.2017.07.017",
language = "English",
volume = "132",
pages = "10--18",
journal = "Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice",
issn = "0168-8227",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Maternal body mass index is a better indicator of large-for-gestational-age infants compared with a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test in early pregnancy

T2 - The JAGS trial

AU - The JAGS Group

AU - Iwama, Noriyuki

AU - Sugiyama, Takashi

AU - Metoki, Hirohito

AU - Kusaka, Hideto

AU - Maki, Jota

AU - Nishigori, Hidekazu

AU - Yaegashi, Nobuo

AU - Sagawa, Norimasa

AU - Hiramatsu, Yuji

AU - Toyoda, Nagayasu

PY - 2017/10

Y1 - 2017/10

N2 - Aims There is no previous study comparing the predictive ability of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) versus a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in early pregnancy for large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants. Methods This multi-institutional prospective cohort study included 966 pregnant Japanese women. A multiple logistic regression model was applied to compare the effect size of pre-pregnancy BMI, fasting plasma glucose (PG), and 1- and 2-h PG levels after a 75-g OGTT performed before 22 weeks gestation for LGA. After these variables were included separately into the model as per continuous variables 1 standard deviation (SD) increase, they were included simultaneously. Results When pre-pregnancy BMI, fasting PG, and 1- and 2-h PG after a 75-g OGTT were separately included in the model, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for LGA per 1 SD increase in pre-pregnancy BMI, fasting, and 1- and 2-h PG were 1.55 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.26–1.91), 1.26 (95% CI: 1.03–1.54), 0.99 (95% CI: 0.78–1.25), and 1.17 (95% CI: 0.93–1.49), respectively. When these variables were included simultaneously, the adjusted ORs per 1 SD increase in pre-pregnancy BMI, fasting, and 1- and 2-h PG were 1.52 (95% CI: 1.23–1.88), 1.19 (95% CI: 0.96–1.46), 0.77 (95% CI: 0.57–1.03), and 1.30 (95% CI: 0.96–1.76), respectively. Conclusions Maternal pre-pregnancy BMI was more strongly associated with LGA compared with a 75-g OGTT in early pregnancy. Health-care providers should recognize that women with a higher pre-pregnancy BMI carry a higher risk for having LGA infants regardless of the results of a 75-g OGTT.

AB - Aims There is no previous study comparing the predictive ability of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) versus a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in early pregnancy for large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants. Methods This multi-institutional prospective cohort study included 966 pregnant Japanese women. A multiple logistic regression model was applied to compare the effect size of pre-pregnancy BMI, fasting plasma glucose (PG), and 1- and 2-h PG levels after a 75-g OGTT performed before 22 weeks gestation for LGA. After these variables were included separately into the model as per continuous variables 1 standard deviation (SD) increase, they were included simultaneously. Results When pre-pregnancy BMI, fasting PG, and 1- and 2-h PG after a 75-g OGTT were separately included in the model, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for LGA per 1 SD increase in pre-pregnancy BMI, fasting, and 1- and 2-h PG were 1.55 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.26–1.91), 1.26 (95% CI: 1.03–1.54), 0.99 (95% CI: 0.78–1.25), and 1.17 (95% CI: 0.93–1.49), respectively. When these variables were included simultaneously, the adjusted ORs per 1 SD increase in pre-pregnancy BMI, fasting, and 1- and 2-h PG were 1.52 (95% CI: 1.23–1.88), 1.19 (95% CI: 0.96–1.46), 0.77 (95% CI: 0.57–1.03), and 1.30 (95% CI: 0.96–1.76), respectively. Conclusions Maternal pre-pregnancy BMI was more strongly associated with LGA compared with a 75-g OGTT in early pregnancy. Health-care providers should recognize that women with a higher pre-pregnancy BMI carry a higher risk for having LGA infants regardless of the results of a 75-g OGTT.

KW - 75-g oral glucose tolerance test

KW - Body mass index

KW - Large-for-gestational age

KW - Pregnancy

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U2 - 10.1016/j.diabres.2017.07.017

DO - 10.1016/j.diabres.2017.07.017

M3 - Article

C2 - 28783528

AN - SCOPUS:85026780384

VL - 132

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JO - Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice

JF - Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice

SN - 0168-8227

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