Magnetic and electrical properties of single-phase, single-crystal Fe16N2 films epitaxially grown by molecular beam epitaxy (invited)

Yutaka Sugita, Hiromasa Takahashi, Matahiro Komuro, Masukazu Igarashi, Ryo Imura, Takashi Kambe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The average magnetic moment per Fe atom for a single-phase, single-crystal Fe16N2(001) film epitaxially grown on a GaAs(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy has been confirmed to be 3.5μB at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Rutherford backscattering. The value was in good agreement with that obtained by using a VSM and by measuring the film thickness (3.3μB per Fe atom). The saturation magnetization 4πMs has been found to increase with decreasing temperature, obeying T3/2 law at lower temperatures. The slope was steeper than that of a pure Fe film, suggesting a lower exchange constant for Fe16N2. The g factor for Fe16N2 has been accurately measured to be 2.17 by using ferromagnetic resonance with changing frequencies of 35.5-115 GHz, which is not unusual compared with the g factor of 2.16 for pure Fe. The resistivity for Fe16N2 has been measured to be around 30 μΩ cm at room temperature compared with 10 μΩ cm for pure Fe and decreases linearly with decreasing temperature. The behavior was that for normal metal and nothing unusual was seen. The anomalous Hall resistivity for Fe16N2 was 4×10-7 V cm/A, which is about three times as large as that for pure Fe. The relationship between the giant magnetic moment and the anomalous Hall resistivity has not been clarified yet.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5576-5581
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Physics
Volume79
Issue number8 PART 2A
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 15 1996
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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